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Charts: Click To Watch School Demographics Change

Livestream: #EquityMatters Gathers Academics & Education Journalists

Watch above, check out the details here. #equitymatters

 

AM News: Grad Rate Record, Chicago Brinksmanship, Student-Teacher Relationship Rankings

U.S. Graduation Rate Breaks Another Record - Education Week ow.ly/HLGP300SQQP

TX leads nation in teacher-student sexual assaults/relationships | khou.compllqt.it/EZGI3V

Chicago Teachers Union blames state school spending impasse on lack of leadership - Chicago Tribune ow.ly/Wc9W300SQ0A

CTU prez suggests teachers could forgo some raises in contract | Chicago Sun-Times ow.ly/i8eZ100aCFS

US SENATE HOPEFUL FORCED TO EXPLAIN 1ST-TO-COLLEGE CLAIM: Associated Press ow.ly/6zP9300SQMU

Mississippi Bans Public Contributions to Superintendents' Association - State EdWatch - Education Week ow.ly/l3g8300SPU5

17 people, including officer, exposed to pepper spray during brawl at L.A. high school - LA Times ow.ly/16rL300SPsu

Question on Utah biology test about aborting fetus prompts policy change | fox13now.comow.ly/67WI300SRBe

Principal Hired to Revive Struggling Boys and Girls High School May Leave - The New York Times ow.ly/P3ju300SPAl

When you’re 21 and this is your second campus shooting
fusion.net/story/309002/u…

Events: Equity Matters Symposium In NYC Friday

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There's a big Equity Matters Symposium being held tomorrow at the Ford Foundation offices in NYC, and while invitations are limited to journalists you can apparently watch via livestream here

Some of the speakers include Gloria Ladson-Billings, Sean Reardon, and Richard Rothstein. 

Some of the Equity Project journalists who will talk about their projects include Alejandra Lagos, Zaidee Stavely, Kristina Rizga, and Patrick Wall. Cara Fitzpatrick, will also be there. Spencer Fellowship head LynNell Hancock, Nikole Hannah-Jones, and Keith Woods are also scheduled to attend.

You can find the full list of Speakers and the Schedule of events by clicking the links.

What's it all about? According to the promo materials, the Equity Matters event "will bring together the nation’s top experts and education journalists in examining the root causes and impact of our nation’s ever-widening “opportunity gap.”

Funded by the Ford Foundation (with whom I've discussed supporting THE GRADE), the Equity Project is part of a broader SF-based initiative called Renaissance Journalism, which sponsors "national initiatives that support journalists and their news organizations to produce ambitious, in-depth and compelling stories that reveal and illuminate social injustice and inequity."
 
In addition to Rizga and Wall, some of the Fellows who've had work sponsored by the Equity Project over the past two years include Charla Bear (KQED), Marquita Brown (News & Record in Greensboro, North Carolina), Kavitha Cardoza (WAMU), Dan Carsen (WBHM), Matt Collette (WNYC, formerly of The Teacher Project), Elisa Crouch (St. Louis Post-Dispatch), Emily DeRuy (The Atlantic), Beth Hawkins (Education Post, formerly MinnPost), Laura Isensee (Houston Public Media), Alejandra Lagos (Univision), Celia Llopis-Jepsen (Topeka Capital-Journal), Rob Manning (Oregon Public Broadcasting), and Claudio Sanchez (NPR).

Some examples of work funded in part by the Renaissance Journalism project include the Detroit Journalism Collaborative's seven-part series on race and poverty. Click here for the full list.

This isn't the first such gathering. There was an event in San Francisco not too long ago featuring Rizga, Pirette McKamey and Robert Roth.

These aren't the only fellowships for education journalists. Others include the Spencer Education Journalism Fellowship (which I received in 2009), new EWA Fellowships, the Teacher Project fellowships (whose work appears in Slate).

Quotes: Re-balancing The Foundation-Education Relationship

Quotes2Philanthropists are not generally education experts, and even if they hire scholars and experts, public officials shouldn’t be allowing them to set the policy agenda for the nation’s public schools. The Gates experience teaches once again that educational silver bullets are in short supply and that some educational trends live only a little longer than mayflies.

- LA Times editorial page (Gates Foundation failures show philanthropists shouldn’t be setting America's public school agenda)

Quotes: Even "Modernizing" The Teach Profession Is Contentious Now?

Quotes2We’ve been talking a lot about the idea of modernizing the teaching profession and that has been a real point of contention with some folks because they say, “We don’t need to change it. We just need to be nicer to teachers. We need to reward teachers more and pay them more.” That reflexive defense of the status quo is just as unhelpful as people who say, “Let’s throw the whole system out and start over.”

-- Lanae Erickson Hatalsky in Education Post (Staying Chill, the Teacher Wars...)

US News: $2.6 Billion In Federal Poverty Funding Going To Wealthier Districts (US News)

At least $2.6B in fed funding goes to districts that are wealthier on average - US News  ow.ly/YPDs300NxkD

New Orleans school unification committee to meet for first time s.nola.com/IyNv4BY

Kansas Parents Worry Schools Are Slipping Amid Budget Battles - The New York Times  ow.ly/J0MD300Nzaw

Take A Ride With A Kentucky School Bus Driver NPR n.pr/1qgU8Dv

High Lead Levels Discovered In Chicago School's Drinking Fountains n.pr/25xX5PW

Teach for America retools efforts to recruit graduates from top colleges wpo.st/bwHd1

Why a High School in Connecticut's Richest County Has Been Failing for 50 Years - The Atlantic ow.ly/nyG7300LF0X

Morning Video: Watch Duckworth Talk Grit At EWA Conference

How interesting, given the current controversy over the research, to listen and watch as Angela Duckworth and Kate Zernike talk about grit at #EWA16.

Curious about the media role in puffing and then pulling down Duckworth's work, check out my recent column: Journalism’s Role In The Current “Grit” Hype/ Criticism Cycle.

Events: Big Fancy NYT Education Conference Coming Next Month

Logo-mr-monopoly-1Spring conference season might be over, but Summer Season is just starting. Among the June events is the NYT higher education conference on June 20, which promises to include 100+ college president types, Times senior editors, and an "interactive program [that] features U.S. Secretary of Education John King, topic specialists Carol Dweck, Angela Duckworth, Amy Cuddy and Nicholas Christakis, and other leading experts." (I'm thinking hologram, right?).  

The Higher Ed Leaders Forum will also include a special “Education Innovation” section in The New York Times. Topics include diversity and free-speech dilemmas, the STEM-humanities debate, sexual assault, the digital future, the crisis in public funding of education and much more.

The “Higher Ed Leaders Forum” is supported by presenting sponsor The Walton Family Foundation, associate sponsors NYU School of Professional Studies and Oppenheimer Funds Inc., supporting sponsor Carnegie Corporation of New York and media sponsor Education Dive

To apply for an invitation and learn more about The New York Times “Higher Ed Leaders Forum,” please visit NYTHigherEdLeadersForum.com.

 

Quotes: Let's Focus On Schools (Forests), Not Teachers (Trees), Says Kingsland

Quotes2It takes an exceptional teacher to marginally increase a student’s test score, and these gains fade out quickly. It takes an average urban charter school to increase a student’s test score, and these gains increase over time.  Lastly, test scores aren’t everything, so we should be cautious in how we use them and we should give strong deference to parental choice.

-- Arnold Foundation's Neerav Kingsland [Missing the Schools for the Teachers (the Folly of the Teacher Wars)]

Charts: Comparing Denver, NOLA, & DC On 2015 PARCC ELA

More data here.

#EDgif Of The Day: EdBuild Map Shows Funding Disaparities Among Similar Districts

New analysis: disparities in k12 funding exist - even among similar districts.  http://bit.ly/1TtaPUu pic.twitter.com/Y98fjCbWcE

ESSA: The Obama Rule, A Clinton Quandary, & "Daylighted" Data To Come*

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Curious about the ESSA funding debate but not sure where to start or why to care? Let me see if I can help sort the substantive, political, and other aspects of the story out for you -- and point you towards and even more obscure part of ESSA that may make the current debate moot.

As you may already know, Senator Alexander and several education groups (including the teachers unions) are strongly opposed to an ESSA rule that the Obama education department has developed. No doubt, requiring districts to document equitable funding outcomes for Title I schools would require a series of changes for states and districts.

In extremely simplified terms, the Obama rule would require that states and districts show that they weren't spending more money on poorer schools* than less poor ones. Complying with the requirement could result in large-scale transfers of teachers, cutting of programs at middle-poverty schools, and other unwanted outcomes.

In establishing this requirement, the Obama rule goes against the flow of play these days, which under ESSA generally limits the USDE's role in overseeing the states and districts and how they use roughly $15 billion a year in federal education funding. According to ESSA, districts are relieved of having to identify specific services as supplemental and the USDE is specifically prohibited from requiring a “specific methodology” for distributing state and local funds.

Ed Week has covered this a number of times, including these two pieces (Education Secretary Advocates Robust ESSA Rules Amid GOP BacklashReport to Congress: Proposed Spending Rules Appear to Exceed ESSA Language). An NPR story this morning (The 'Intolerable' Fight Over School Money) adds that Senator Alexander has told states to resist this regulation if it isn't changed or stopped through other means. A NYT piece by New America's Kevin Carey (Why There’s an Uproar Over Trying to Increase Funding for Poor Schools) tells the backstory and makes the case in favor of the Obama position.

During a phone interview earlier this morning, Carey explained that the crafty folks at the USDE decided that the new law didn’t block them from requiring states to document comparable outcomes, as long as they didn’t meddle in the methods. “It’s a new and very different interpretation of the ‘supplement, not supplant’ rule,” according to Carey – but not an unjustifiable one. (On Twitter, economist Bruce Baker took issue with Carey's analysis, and the original headline of the piece [Why Poor Districts Receive Less Government School Funding Than Rich Ones] was quickly changed.) 

It comes down to semantics, really. If ESSA bans the USDE from establishing any specific method of allocating funding, does that also mean that it can’t require the resulting amounts to be equitable?

Nine Democratic Senators (including Senator Sanders and Senator Warren) are supporting the Obama position. A group of civil rights organizations is also supportive. 

We still don't know where Senator Murray and Hillary Clinton stand on the issue -- I've asked the Clinton campaign and will let you know when they respond. 

It’s worth adding that the Obama administration has made regular use of whatever flexibility it can find in federal law in the past. The 2009 Race to the Top initiative, the SIG program, and the NCLB waiver program all stretched – or perhaps broke – the limits of the USDE’s statutory and regulatory powers.

In pushing ahead with this ESSA rule the Obama administration could be seen as creating problems for the Clinton campaign. It certainly isn't taking a backseat and giving the presumptive nominee as much maneuvering room as possible. 

Even if the USDE blinks first, funding expert Marguerite Roza argues in the Brookings blog that a transparency provision put into the law by Senator Bennet is going to end up having much the same effect (More equitable spending on its way regardless of rulemaking). 

Roza argues that, when differentials between schools are finally published, it will become difficult for lawmakers to continue doing what they've done for so long:

"When the spending data are daylighted, the evidence will be clear that many districts have hardwired systematic spending inequities in their operations.... School boards will have no choice but to do the hard work of rethinking longstanding policies that contributed to the uneven spending."

*Correction: The original version stated poorer districts, not schools.

AM News: Federal Funding Dispute, Segregation Surge, CA Grad Rate Uptick

The 'Intolerable' Fight Over School Money : NPR Ed : NPR pllqt.it/EfH7Sc

On the anniversary of Brown v. Board, new evidence that U.S. schools are resegregating - Washington Post ow.ly/yL26300k0sk

Black And Latino Students Lose Out To White Peers. And It's Getting Worse. - HuffPost ow.ly/NiC7300k1fl

Lusher teachers reject union for collective bargaining | NOLA.comow.ly/BwCh300k1Vu

California high school students graduating at record rate - SFGate ow.ly/tykr300k20z

Are more engaging classes improving California graduation rates? scpr.org/news/2016/05/1…

Boston Students Walk Out To Protest Proposed Cuts ow.ly/xshc300k26F

LAUSD puts millions into its magnet expansion - LA School Report ow.ly/G6JP300k0eG

Girls better at leveraging tech to solve problems - POLITICO ow.ly/X4IT300k1Xc

Charts: Teachers Estimate Time Spent On State & District Testing

F4A_Teacher-estimated_time_per_year_spent_preparing_students_for_mandated_tests (1)From CEP.

 

AM News: Girls Beat Boys On Tech/Engineering Test, Plus Other Tuesday Stories

Girls outscore boys on inaugural national test of technology, engineering skills - The Washington Post  ow.ly/PjPe300hr1w 

PA Governor not ready to revise teacher layoff law :: SI&A Cabinet Report ow.ly/Ssgt300hrF3

Pearson gets emergency test scoring contract from Tennessee | Chalkbeatow.ly/Zz2z1005u57

A First: Pell Grants For High School Students Who Take College Classes : NPR Ed : NPR ow.ly/dd6y300hr9s

Some, But Not All of New i3 Grants Will Prioritize School Integration - Politics K-12 - Education Week ow.ly/TK7d300hrdt

Desegregation order: Mississippi district must merge schools: AP Article ow.ly/9Rfb300hrfY

Candidate for CPS principals' group arrested on phone charge | Chicago Sun-Times ow.ly/AjvX300hrQe

What if one culture shares multiple languages? That’s a challenge Oregon is taking up with its Somali students. ow.ly/keqD300hrnc

Uncovering the Stark Disparities Behind School Money - ProPublica ow.ly/wkcn300hrLK

Old time courtesies getting new currency in Maryland schools offsetting disrespect with etiquette lessons. fw.to/oEY9Jlh

Chicago Principal Grapples With Potential Budget Cuts | WBEZ ow.ly/yKx7300g9Ck

Events: Another Week, Another Education Summit

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"At the second annual Education Summit, The Atlantic will illuminate the most pressing debates in the education world today, from cradle to college," says the promo copy for Education Summit 2016. It start tomorrow morning and continues Wednesday, in DC. Topics under discussed are listed as ESSA, Common Core, School to Prison Pipeline, Speech on College Campuses, and College Affordability. Speakers and panelists include Jen Holleran, executive director of Startup:Education (part of the Chan Zuckerberg effort). The Atlantic's education editor, Alia Wong, will also participate. Hashtag? Livestream? LMK. 

Maps: Slow Progress On Preschool

Or, as the Huffington Post put it, "At This Rate, It Will Be A Very Long Time Before Every Child Gets Access To Preschool."

Map: Virtual Schools In Most States Have "Unacceptably Low" Graduation Rates

Quotes: When Even School Advocates Can't Figure Out The System

Quotes2Here I was this advocate for education, and I couldn’t find a place for my son... I was crying in the principal’s office and I said, ‘I don’t know what to do.’ The principal said, ‘I don’t either.

Parent and advocate Arlyssa Heard in The Atlantic (The Bills That Want to Solve Detroit's School Crisis)

Quotes: Remediation's A Suburban Problem, Too

Quotes2More than a half-million poorly prepared students — or about one in four — were required to take remedial courses in math, English or writing. Forty-five percent of them came from middle-, upper-middle- and high-income families... At private, nonprofit four-year schools, for example, students whose families were in the top 20 percent of income nationally actually took more remedial courses than students in the bottom 20 percent at the same colleges.

-- NYT editorial page (aka Brent Staples) in Guess Who’s Taking Remedial Classes

Quotes: Now What For States Making Late Testing Changes?

Quotes2In their haste to pull away from something they didn’t want, many states were left without backup plans. They quickly assembled new testing programs that, all over the country, are now backfiring. Three or more years is generally what’s needed to design and vet a new test, but some states, including Indiana, are trying to do that work in two years or less. 

-- Chalkbeat's Shaina Cavasos in They rejected multi-state Common Core exams. Now what?

Quotes: A New Era In Education Philanthropy?

Quotes2Signs abound that this era of polarization is giving way to a different and more constructive phase in U.S. efforts to boost student achievement.... The dawn of a new era of K-12 philanthropy .... Funders [like Walton and Broad] are no longer the dominant drivers.

Inside Philanthropy's David Callahn (The New Era of K-12 Philanthropy)

Charts: Inter-District Racial Segregation Is The Real [Much Harder] Problem, Folks

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So much of the recent attention towards school segregation has focused on within-district segregation, which makes sense. Gentrification, attendance zone boundaries, immigration, and other factors all play a role there, and are relatively easily understood and at least theoretically addressed by a single school district or mayoral agency.  

But as USC's Ann Owens explained at last week's #EWA16 event, the most segregation takes place between different districts.

One reason this may garner less attention is that it makes it harder to consider what the solutions might be when two semi-autonomous public agencies are involved, and one of them is probably much better-off than the other. Consolidating districts? Good luck with that. Transfer agreements between districts? NCLB called for those but generated precious few actual transfers.

Interested in more about media coverage of segregation? Check out my column at The Grade about the surge in coverage, and some possible problems it raises.

Credit Ann Owens and sources listed.

 

Morning Video: Best-Off Districts Often Generate Biggest Achievement Gaps

"There's some deep ... problems that we as a society haven't faced up to yet.," says"Sean Reardon, a professor of poverty and inequality in education at Stanford University in this EdWeek video and article (Achievement Gaps and Racial Segregation: Research Finds an Insidious Cycle)

Quotes: School Funding As "A Kind Of Mission Creep"

Quotes2Did Mary's mother get arrested the night before? Did Johnny not come with shoes to school? Those aren't to me core issues of education.

Republican Indiana state Rep. Tim Brown in NPR (What Difference Does A Dollar Make?)

Charts: Income & Achievement Matches -- With Variations

A NYT piece out today emphasizes the strong correlation between income and student achievement. This chart reads: "6th graders in richest districts test 4 grades ahead of peers in poorest."

Some districts, like Union City, NJ seem to beat the odds. Others -- especially areas with large SES variations and school segregation -- show large gaps between low- and high-income student populations. 

Folks like @thaddomina were quick to point out that the data also show that "the variation among SES-similar districts is important, too." The MSDF's Joe Siedleki picked New Orleans out.

Events: Previewing Next Week's EWA National Conference In Boston

image from www.ewa.org

The 69th Education Writers Association National Seminar is taking place starting Sunday, and all your favorite education journalists are scheduled to be there: members of the NPR education team, the NYT's Peabody-winning Nikole Hannah-Jones, the Tampa Bay Times' Pulitzer-winning Cara Fitzpatrick and Lisa Gartner, the the NYT's Kate Zernike, WSJ's Leslie Brody, etc. Plus there will be many big-name policy wonks and education leaders, such as Boston superintendent Tommy Chang, Stanford's Sean Reardon, UPenn's Angela Duckworth, the AFT's Randi Weingarten, MA's Mitch Chester, and EdSec John King.

The vast majority of the upcoming EWA annual conference in Boston starting this weekend is dedicated to helping journalists understand hot topics in education. There's an app. There's a print program. There are "lightning talks." There's a hashtag: #EWA16.

But there are also a slew of few panels and events focused on education journalism itself, including of course the annual EWA awards.  The first morning of the conference is focused on journalists describing how they reported a challenging topic, using data, adding audio, and getting access. The afternoon session includes journalists like Kristina Rizga and Dale Russakoff talking about their book-length projects. Some of the "Lightning Talks" -- 5 Mistakes Journos Make When Covering Ed Research, How to Really Talk with Boys from Diverse Backgrounds, Maximizing Digital Media for Reporting -- focus on the tools of the trade.

The only topics missing that I can see are writing for social media (Snapchat, Facebook Live) and using images and graphics.

Teachers and education reporters have lots in common, notes EWA head Caroline Hendrie in the program introduction: "In both education and journalism, interest in addressing inequality and injustice – social, economic, and institutional – is on the rise. Both educators and members of the news media face demands for greater fairness from the communities affected by their work. Concern about inculcating cultural competence in both educators and reporters is keen. How to diversify both fields’ workforces remains a stubborn problem. At the same time, the two sectors are struggling to meet ever-changing standards of quality. After all, both fields are traversing periods of transformation, as new technologies and standards of excellence continuously redefine success."

Indeed, as has been noted before, the overlap between education reporters and educators -- including lack of diversity -- raises some interesting issues.

The results of the EWA member survey will be released on Sunday. For more on #edJOC read Why Nikole Hannah-Jones Matters (To Education Journalism In Particular) or read some of the related posts at the bottom of the page. 

Another notable angle: For the first time in recent memory, the EWA award winners will be announced at this event -- after the Peabody and Pulitzer awards have already been named. For background on the finalists, read Hits, Misses, Snubs, & Mysteries.

Who funds all this? Well, the event is co-sponsored with BU's Communications and Education Schools, and the sponsor page includes the Nellie Mae Education Foundation, Raikes, Wallace, Walton, Hewlett, Nellie Mae, American Federation of Teachers, Pearson, College Board, Edwin Gould, Gates, National Education Association, Secure Schools Alliance, American Institutes for Research, and Scholastic. Programming for new reporters comes from  Spencer and the W.T. Grant Foundation.

Related posts: Efforts To Recruit More Journalists Of Color (To Cover Education)Just How White Is Education Journalism — & How To Encourage More #edJOC?New Opportunities - & New Challenges - For 7 Education Journalism TeamsDelightful High School Swim Class Story Wins Murrow Journalism AwardSchool Segregation Coverage Wins 2 Pulitzers & A Peabody.

Quotes: NYC's Publicly Funded Preschool Expansion Looks A Lot Like A Voucher Program

Quotes2Observers and policymakers refer easily to New York’s pre-K program as part of the “public” education system or at the very least as a “public” education program. Yet vouchers for K-12 private schools are often criticized for “privatizing” public education.

-- James Ryan in Medium (The Largest Voucher Program You’ve Never Heard About)

AM News: Here Come Uninspiring New NAEP Scores For HS Seniors

Most High School Seniors Aren't College Or Career Ready, Says 'Nation's Report Card' : NPR Ed : NPR ow.ly/4n9oj1 

Math scores slip, reading flat for nation's 12th-graders - AP https://t.co/ANTh5sWVJh

 America's high school seniors' reading and math scores have hit a wall - LA Times pllqt.it/Z4qQVg

Test Scores Show a Decline in Math Among High School Seniors - The New York Times ow.ly/4n9mLQ

U.S. high school seniors slip in math and show no improvement in reading - The Washington Post ow.ly/4n9oft

TNReady Testing Patience of Parents / Public News Service ow.ly/4n9n4N

Career Education Making a Comeback in US High Schools - ABC News ow.ly/4n9oyt

Troy LaRaviere Accused By CPS Of Misusing Equipment, Accounting Missteps dnain.fo/1WR3JOx

Lusher NOLA Charter School Board Rejects Petition To Recognize Union | WWNO

Michelle Obama Encourages New York Students to Reach Higher - ABC News ow.ly/4n9mOb

Quotes: DCPS Henderson Cites Bush's "Soft Bigotry" Line

Quotes2Far too many adults are empathetic and sympathetic to our young people and they want to cut them some slack and in fact that is the worst this you can do for kids who are struggling or kids who are behind or kids who come from vulnerable families.... That’s absolutely wrong. The reason why the Common Core is important and has very real implications around race and class is what former President Bush referred to as the ‘soft bigotry of low expectations.’ When we hold kids to high expectations they rise to them.

- DCPS head Kaya Henderson in WAMU segment (Teachers In D.C, Maryland Keep Up The Pressure As PARCC Season Is Upon Us)

#EDgif Of The Day: Does It Matter That The Funding Fairy Only Visits Some Schools?

 

From NPR: The School Spending Debate: What Difference Does A Dollar Make? #schoolmoney

Quotes: Parents Need To Ask Tougher Questions To Combat Misperceptions

Quotes2Build deeper relationships and ask tougher questions of your student's teachers...Instead of the teacher just saying, 'He's a great kid,' ask, 'Is he reading on grade level?' 

-- Bibb Hibbard in NPR (9 Out Of 10 Parents Think Their Kids Are On Grade Level. They're Probably Wrong)

Morning Video: King Takes On Desegregation

 

Skip to the 32:00' mark to watch EdSec King talk at a recent Century Foundation event about encouraging districts to return to school desegregation. Seems like it might be too little too late to me, but it's certainly an interesting thing to have discussed.

Or, watch Chicago teachers union head in a public TV segment on her fiery speech yesterday.

Charts: Rise Of Special Ed Students

EdWeek charts uptick in kids with IEPs after long-running declines.

Morning Video: It's Not Just Flint Schools That Have Water Safety Concerns

"Over the past few decades, school districts in Los Angeles, New York City, Seattle, Washington and elsewhere have found higher than acceptable lead levels in their students’ drinking water due to old plumbing systems." via PBS NewsHour.

Events: Conferencing In Arizona #ASUGSVsummit

I'm not there, but you may be -- the annual ASU-GSV confab is happening this week.

Read all about some of the proceedings above, or following along live via @asugsvsummit or .

Folks I know who are there or following from afar include @PrincipalEJT@joemanko, , and .

 

Charts: There Many Different Kinds Of Homeless Students In Schools

More than 1 million kids lack a home of their own -- many doubled up with other families. Via Ben Spielberg & the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Quotes: Public Charter Schools Claiming Private Status When Teachers Organize

Quotes2We've decided that when teachers really want a voice, to just organize under whatever law is operational... But then as soon as we start organizing, these same charter operators who in one breath say it's a public school, in the other breath say when it comes to school teachers, it's private, not public.

AFT head Randi Weingarten in Bloomberg BNA (Charter School Teachers Organizing Under Federal Labor Law)

#edGIF Of The Day: "Why Is Being Educated Considered A 'White Thing'"?

One of BuzzFeed's latest videos, purportedly about questions black people want to ask other black people, has generated reactions ranging from 😬 to 😡.

One of the questions is a version of the age-old "acting white" issue, which Vox debunked not too long ago: The most insidious myth about black kids and achievement

Seriously, some people are really offended by the attempted humor. For example: 27 Answers To Buzzfeed’s Dumb Video. This is probably where I should provide a trigger warning. 

Related posts: Why Do Journalists Love Shaky Science on Race? Eduwonkette; How Barack Obama's Election Can Change the Myth of 'Acting White' NY Mag.

 

Charts: Riverside, San Antonio, Houston Top "Low College Grad Rate" List

Via The Atlantic via EWA

Events: NYU "Politics Of Privatization" Summit [#PoPNonCon16] Going On Now

image from 2f4bc62sl54p25xk8ry2ld34.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com
In case you haven't seen it, there's a "Non-Conference" on Privatization in Education at NYU going on this week.

According to the website, discussants will include education historian and NYU Steinhardt research professor Diane Ravitch; and union leaders Lily Eskelsen García of the National Education Association and Randi Weingarten of the American Federation of Teachers.

The hashtag is #PoPNonCon16. The livestream is here.

Apparently, there's a Bernie Sanders rally going on across the street.

 

 

#edGIF Of The Day: The Harsh Truth About Speed-Reading

tdd-speed-reading-apps
 
"For a long time, people have claimed to be able to read very quickly without any loss of comprehension — and many have claimed to teach this amazing skill."
From Kernel (The harsh truth about speed-reading).
 

Afternoon Video: Income-Based School Integration?

"Nearly 100 school districts and charter school networks are now consciously integrating their student bodies by socioeconomic status." via The Seventy Four.

Morning Video: Digital Education, Promise and Perils

Here's last night's PBS NewsHour segment on personalized learning and data security questions, which opens in a Miami school that features education technology. 

Or, watch EdWeek's ESSA explainer and see how many staffers you can recognize in their cameos.

Chart: Nearly Half Of HS Grads Taking "No Cohesive Curriculum"

Only 8 Percent of Students Complete College- and Career-Ready Curriculum, according to EdWeek story on new EdTrust report.

 

Quotes: Time "Running Out" For Common Core Advocates

Quotes2CCSS advocates say it is too early to tell, and we’ll just have to wait to see the benefits.  That defense won’t work much longer.  Time is running out.  The political challenges that Common Core faces the remainder of this year may determine whether it survives.

- Brookings' Tom Loveless (Common Core’s major political challenges for the remainder of 2016)

#edGIF Of The Day: SAT Security Hole Plus Foreign Student Spike

The reason you care is that Reuters is reporting a "major security hole with the SAT" in which the College Board gave SAT tests that "it knew had been compromised in Asia."

Quotes: Ravitch Claims Victory

Quotes2Everything the corporate reformers do has failed. Their day has come and gone. ... They remain in power by deception and the power of money, not the efficacy of their ideas. They will go out with the tide. 

- Diane Ravitch on her blog (26 Million Page Views! Thank You!)

Charts: More Cops Than Counselors In NYC, Chicago, & Miami-Dade (But Not LA)

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Interesting to note that LAUSD has more counselors than cops, and many fewer of both than NYC, Chicago, or Miami-Dade. From The Seventy Four. See more detail here and here.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in This Week In Education are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.