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Books: Ignoring Race Not The Solution For Schools

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Here's a review of a book that sounds really interesting and timely:

"Many saw the 2008 election of Barack Obama as a sign that America had moved past the issue of race, that a colorblind society was finally within reach.

"But as Marianne Modica reveals in Race Among Friends, attempts to be colorblind do not end racism—in fact, ignoring race increases the likelihood that racism will occur in our schools and in society.  

"Modica finds that even in an environment where students of all racial backgrounds work and play together harmoniously, race affects the daily experiences of students and teachers in profound but unexamined ways.

"In the end, the school’s friendly environment did not promote—and may have hindered—serious discussion of race and racial inequity.   The desire to ignore race in favor of a “colorblind society,” Modica writes, has become an entrenched part of American culture. But as Race Among Friends shows, when race becomes a taboo subject, it has serious ramifications for students and teachers of all ethnic origins."  

You can listen to an interview she did on WNYC in December.

Related posts: New Yorker Writer's Year Embedded In High School EnglishTa-Nehesi Coates' New Book On Race (& Schooling) In America 'Confessions Of A Headmaster'Teacher Perceptions Of Autonomy Vary By RaceEducators & Advocates Need Authentic Conversations About Race, Too.

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