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Five Best Blogs: This Scary Man Wants To Teach You Science

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Latest installment in Slate's science education issue includes unfortunately creepy closeup of Finnish sci teacher ow.ly/bRVpe 

Harsh Punishment for Misbehavior in Texas Schools | PBS NewsHour [from last night] ow.ly/bRSOE

Aspen Ideas Festival education sessions start THURS -- @educationnation promo list ow.ly/bRHct hashtag? #AspenIdeas

Will other groups follow EdVoice's lead using the courts to litigate school compliance? @PIEnetwork ponders ow.ly/bRVfl 

Conn. Joining Teacher Trend - WSJ.comow.ly/bRSA0

Elite HS cheating scandals in NY and NC @HuffPostEdu ow.ly/bRSk5 Quick, blame NCLB!

TN touts "largest aggregated gain" in history of state tests and gets kudos from Arne Duncan ow.ly/bRQBb@TNedu 

Unions esp. necessary during recessions - Mark Thoma in the Fiscal Times via @wonkbooks ow.ly/bRIBp

Like it when I tweet your stuff? Might be good form to return the favor. You know who you are. 

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Cambridge's Pre-U science programmes are stronger than any of those featured by Slate -- but they aren't for everybody. We need to distinguish between students, with their different skills and interests, more in the last years of secondary school, rather than have everyone try to squeeze into a single national mold, too often the case in east Asia, or have everyone go to the same type of school with rushed impersonal counsellors pushing everyone into stereotypical college prep schedules, which is the default scenario in our high schools. Instead, our students who have just finished their first year of high school should use their summer break to decide upon which courses they might specialize in for the remaining years of secondary school, so as to establish some distinction between themselves in the eyes of college admissions committees.

Funny how educators rant about bullying, and, yet, are silent about a blog post that suggests a science teacher is "scary" and "creepy" because of a picture. Next time this teacher sits for the time-honored tradition of annual school photos, he'll remember to correct the lighting, shave for the one day stubble look, and get out his Brooks Brothers button-down blue shirt so he can be sure to garner the approval of his American education peers. Now, I am really starting to see the difference between American and Finnish education -- it's all in the look! I think there's a spot on The Plastics (from Mean Girls) for you, Mr. Russo!

Susan’s got a point. For all we know, he’s a nice guy, a great educator, probably. Not fair to comment on his appearance and judge him by it.

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