About this blog Subscribe to this blog

Events: "The Truth About Testing" At Columbia J-School

30-days-of-average4Following up on last Spring's workshop on private philanthropy, the Columbia Journalism School is putting on another workshop this weekend -- this time on standardized testing.  I'm disappointed that testing industry insider Todd Farley isn't a panelist but am hoping that there will be some challenging voices there along with testing experts.  It's certainly an interesting time to think about testing, given changes proposed to NCLB, the spread of the Common Core, and the rise of interim assessments in some districts and schools.  Scheduled panlists include Daniel Koretz, Jon Snyder, Robert J. Tobias, Heather Vogell, (reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution), David Coleman, Laura Slover.  Titled "The Truth About Testing," the event runs Friday and Saturday and is invitation only.  Sponsored by Atlantic Philanthropies.  Related post:  The Myth Of The All-Powerful Billionaires.

Comments

TrackBack URL for this entry:
https://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e54f8c25c988340153928cf569970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Events: "The Truth About Testing" At Columbia J-School:

Permalink

Permalink URL for this entry:
https://scholasticadministrator.typepad.com/thisweekineducation/2011/10/events-the-truth-about-testing-at-columbia-j-school.html

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

A person who really deserves to be there is Howard Wainer, former chief statistician for ETS who now teaches at the Wharton School. He has just published a book, "Uneducated Guesses", via Princeton University Press last month, and it's the education book I'd most like to read next. In it he argues that a lot of people who don't understand testing or statistical inference are nonetheless making claims, policy proposals, and arguments that are invalid and potentially ruinous for public education. And unlike most commentators regarding education, this is someone who has been well positioned to know what he's talking about. To not invite him is to miss a real opportunity for both education pundits and the broader community. Here's a link to a story about him: http://www.substancenews.net/articles.php?page=2602

The comments to this entry are closed.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in This Week In Education are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.