About this blog Subscribe to this blog

Thompson: Why Saturday School Remediation Rarely Works

Saturday The Philadelphia Public School Notebook's Katrina Morrison reports that attendance rates for Saturday School for the city's Promise academies was 48%.  This is further confirmation of the work of Robert Balfanz and others that explains why remediation is not the way to improve schools.  Students who are behind need the same holistic and engaging instruction that works for high-performing students.  When after-school remediation works, it is due to opportunities for one-on-one attention and field trips.  So, why not institutionalize them during the school day?- JT (@drjohnthompson)Image via.    

Comments

TrackBack URL for this entry:
https://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e54f8c25c988340154344d52a4970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Thompson: Why Saturday School Remediation Rarely Works:

Permalink

Permalink URL for this entry:
https://scholasticadministrator.typepad.com/thisweekineducation/2011/08/thompson-remediation-rarely-works.html

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Huh? So because of the failure to generate adequate attendance, Saturday remediation doesn't work? Thats like saying because we couldn't get people to show up at the hospital our polio vaccine doesn't work.

This reads like a contorted rationale to argue for more "experiential learning", also something that has failed to produce results.

Interesting that Saturday tutoring doesn't draw a bigger crowd, since it is always named something that suggests awesomeness and fun, like "Super-Success-Roller-Coaster-Saturday-Brain-Candy-Blast-Off-Academy."

Who would turn that down at 7AM on a weekend?

Jeff,

Actually, its like saying that giving half doses of a vacine has been shown to rarely work. Your post sounds like a contorted version of LOW EXPECTATIONS. We taught it, if half of the kids don't show up, its not my fault.

Seriously, the evidence shows that remediation can work in schools with dozens of kids who are 2 oe 3 years below grade level, but not in schools where hundreds are five or six below grade level.

I came to neighborhood schools from programs where experiential learning worked for the poorest kids, but I was dismayed by its lower levels of success in schools with much larger concentrations of kids with disadvantages,playing under the rules and the culture of schools. Experiential learning, I believe, is still the best approach, but I work not bet the farm, gambling that it could drive the turnaround of Promise Schools.

But, as Roxanna implies, the answers must include an appeal to kids' desires. We've got to help them enjoy learning. Coercing more adults and kids to just work harder to catch up won't work.

Successful marketing is a key component, no doubt. But we aren't putting our thinking caps all the way on. Perhaps we should also consider local legislative changes that coerce or require attendance. Desperate times call for out-of-the-box measures. Democracy is greatly over-rated in this regard.

Successful marketing is a key component, no doubt. But we aren't putting our thinking caps all the way on. Perhaps we should also consider local legislative changes that coerce or require attendance.

wow nice article about Saturday school

WOW I like "Super-Success-Roller-Coaster-Saturday-Brain-Candy-Blast-Off-Academy."

The comments to this entry are closed.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in This Week In Education are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.