About this blog Subscribe to this blog

Quotes: Why People Don't Like NCLB (Really)

Quotes2 Some people don’t like the mirror. Some don’t like what it reveals. - Steve Peha 

Comments

TrackBack URL for this entry:
https://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e54f8c25c98834015390c76ca1970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Quotes: Why People Don't Like NCLB (Really):

Permalink

Permalink URL for this entry:
https://scholasticadministrator.typepad.com/thisweekineducation/2011/08/quotes-why-people-dont-like-nclb-really.html

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

I didn't find that view very factual. Sanctions are attached to schools who fail to meet the defined number. State level bureaucrats have played with the numbers so that their States don't look so bad. When high scoring schools is the goal to achieve, it is not a leap of logic for school district leadership would direct the schools to meet that bar.

NCLB was a huge expensive and restrictive federal initiative. Parents have been complaining for some time about the national obsession with test prep. I think we need an honest and factual analysis of what was effective, what was not effective, and who benefits. Taking the position that the public schools are/were failing is a familiar narrative used by education reform advocates.

A funhouse mirror that reveals the distortions of its backers.

The link is to "Title I-derland", if you haven't followed it.

There's a banner at the top of the page. For $47, you can download this product:
"Private Schools, Public Funds: Providing Title I Services to Private School Children."

Public funds, private profit. You reformers, salivating over the easy Title I pickings, rob the children I teach. With lying, disingenuous pieces like this, you sow fear, uncertainty, and doubt as a weapon against honest schools. Your agenda is just to cripple them, so you can feed on their budgets.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in This Week In Education are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.