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Chart: Costs Of Online Instruction 40 Percent Less

Picture 19
Yesterday, more than 58,000 people signed up for a free online course at Stanford.  Today, the folks at Knewton sent me a chart that, among its many factoids, includes this one that I feel is behind at least some of the current push towards blended learning. Yes, things are that slow.  Yes, I'm that lazy.  No, I don't actually believe that the cost difference is so great or the effectiveness is that clear.  

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I think we need to post that link for people who still claim the Gates Foundation or the Milken Family Foundation are philanthropies. The destruction of brick-and-mortar, flesh-and-blood public assets is being driven by marketing strategists who have their eyes on the public revenues, and their heels on our throats.

Except for the likes of you, Alexander. Nobody has a heel on your throat, yet you carefully maintain your insider status with your small circle of arrogant hired enablers. This post shows you know exactly what's driving the E-learning push. You should say so now, out loud, while you can still pay some small price for honesty. Later, it will count for nothing that you posted a few smart-aleck taunts against them, while you kept licking up their gravy.

Which factoid are you looking at, though? The $700 billion feeding trough stopped me cold. Doesn't that explain ALL the frenzy, and not just some of it?

And phone sex is cheaper than a hooker too.

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