About this blog Subscribe to this blog

Five Best Blogs: "Disruptiness" In Education Reform

Singinintherain Disruptiness in K-12 Sherman Dorn: To wave one's hand and ignore either the history of public-private interfaces in education or the history of problems with unregulated privatization is foolhardy... First Year of Teacherpocalypse EIA:  Hiring 81,000 people one year and laying off 31,000 the next is the hallmark of a system in which there is no direct relationship between the size of the workforce and the mission it undertakes... Dear Diane: Education Next: After several years (more or less) of fairly relentless criticisms of school reformers, she is back to her old self today, telling the New York Times that the new NAEP history  test results are “alarming.”... “I Used to Think . . . And Now I Think . . .” Harvard Education Letter: I used to think that policy was the solution. And now I think that policy is the problem... When you actually know the topic about which The Economist writes:  Schools aren’t being shuttered willy-nilly, leaving little Johnnies and little Susies without... Fact Checking the National Council on Teacher Quality John Thompson: The problems are always the same - education schools, due process, not enough performance pay, and the failure to use enough standardized testing when evaluating teachers... 

 

Comments

TrackBack URL for this entry:
https://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e54f8c25c9883401538f412303970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Five Best Blogs: "Disruptiness" In Education Reform:

Permalink

Permalink URL for this entry:
https://scholasticadministrator.typepad.com/thisweekineducation/2011/06/five-best-blogs--2.html

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

The Harvard Education Letter post of Professor Elmore is thought-provoking and recommended. The machinations of policy makers in education have been sufficiently exasperating as to turn me into almost a small-government Republican in this one field, unlike my general political leanings. I can't help but wonder how many other educators, generally left-leaning in most respects, feel the same way.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in This Week In Education are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.