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Tech: How Long Until Drones Patrol Schoolyards?

image from www.dpsd.org The Washington Post tells us that remote-c0ntrol drones, once limited to far-off battlefields, have already made their way into the arsenals of several domestic agencies  including local police departments.   District-based safety folks love new technology as much as anyone else, so I'm guessing it only takes three years before someone buys one of these unarmed thing for use in some real or imagined crisis situation.  

 

 

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Surely you jest, Alexander? School safety personnel do not get budgets for training, much less technology. And in today's education world where boards and administrations are putting school safety staff and programs first on the chopping block (penny-wise, pound-foolish),they won't even be around in a couple years for the "real or imagined crisis" you referenced in your post!

Ken Trump

The Israelis are already producing drones the size of pencils that can fly through windows and spy within rooms. However, if they really wanted to improve safety through surveillance, they could just install cctvs in every room. Drone technology, if it comes to schools, will be done stealthily and will have the primary function of spying on employees. There is no other way to justify the costs, as severe school violence is relatively rare (but teachers who annoy administrators are relatively common).

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