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READING: Weekend Reading August 1-2

Can't wait for the week to start?  Here are some good readings from over the weekend:

Takeover Agents Confront the Challenges Ahead Washington Post
Neither Rhee nor Justin Cohen, her deputy in charge of the partnership program, would agree to an interview. Requests for copies of quarterly progress reports and evaluations were also denied.

The next few weeks could determine the fate of Barack Obama’s presidency

Wage Learners Governing3772873071_465fae1566-490x308
New York is not the only city that’s been paying kids to hit the books. Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago and Washington, D.C., all have tried out cash-for-grades programs on a pilot basis recently.

We're public...no, we're private In These Times
The questions of whether they indeed are public or private and whether their teachers can win the same collective bargaining rights are now being hotly debated, negotiated and litigated.

Two local programs offer alternatives to the failing system. One of them transforms teenage offenders into attorneys. The other wants to change our notion of justice...

That rush to build has left the county with more than 25,000 empty classroom seats...That comes to about 1,400 classrooms... a staggering $350 million wasted on unnecessary classrooms additions and schools.

Mozart effect -- for real this time Miller McCune
A new study finds listening to Mozart can indeed provide a boost for the brain — but only in non-musicians.
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When D.C. wants to turnaround a school where 19 girls are arrested in one day and students walk in and out of class disrupting learning, they go to a charter school leader who has the guts to do what they don't dare.

I can't believe I'm thinking this, but I support the charter school policy of an automatic suspension for any male who disrepects a female. The institutionalization of sexism is troubling.

But in this case, I see it as a big step, going 1/2 way to the goal where everyone deserves respect.

The same applies to the Harlem Children Zone and Charter School unionization story. If we start 20 HCZ, its in our power to make them all union. Expand charters and hold them accountable, and unionization will expand.

So, we should start where we're at and not be discoouraged. Isn't that the lessson of the article about the students who become attorneys in assessing school discipline?

Democracy will usually triumph.

I saw the news recently about this topic, I think it went a bit to far with all those different coments with the public thinking that President was racist, eveyone make mistakes and you can't judge him on one silly comment.

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