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TEACHING: A Facebook For Lesson-Sharing

Picture 14 It was fun to meet some new faces at the NSVF event, including some folks who’d just gotten funded.  CEO Alex Grodd’s BetterLesson, a Boston-based startup, beat out a slew of other, brand-name folks (like TFA) who have been working on lesson sharing for years.  BetterLesson bills itself as providing “collaborative curriculum development.”  It sort of sounds like Yelp (or Metacritic) for lesson plans. Or, sure, Facebook.  Sorta. It's in private beta now -- check it out and maybe you can get in on the ground floor. Just make sure that they're not going to use all your best stuff without giving you recognition (and maybe even a slice of the N$VF pie).

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Thanks for sharing this! I'm waiting for my beta invite to arrive, but did read the fine print. You retain copyright over everything you upload (and should only upload what you have copyright over). Much better than TFA's which ends up owning anything you share.

For what it's worth, my ideal would let the uploader specify what copyright they want to use to share, encouraging creative commons sharing similar to Flickr.


Edit. Looks like my html links aren't working. Full urls below instead.
Fine print is here: http://www.betterlesson.org/public/terms_of_service

Creative commons at Flickr is here: http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons

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