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THINK TANKS: $100 Billion (A Year) To Get Rid Of School Boards

MOpGPxVqkhl75cm9wVqer0OAo1_400 Each time out, Matt Miller gets slightly more savvy about his idea to get rid of local school boards, focusing not just on the benefits of getting rid of these relics but the practicalities of getting such a major change implemented.

This time out (Nixon’s the One — to Imitate on Education) Miller debunks the notion that most urban districts are dens of corruption that spend more than their suburban counterparts, points out that we've already nationalized much of our financial system (health care is next), and goes back to a 1972 Nixon-era study calling for the feds to cover 25-30 percent of education costs.  Miller even acknowledges that "A little more federal money might be needed to sweeten the pot, round up the votes and give a boost to the poorest schools." 

Getting closer, Matt.  But you still don't have much of a plan for how to persuade Congress, that bastion of local control, to vote for the change, or much for how to pay for the $100B or so per year that it would take to boost federal education spending to those levels.

Previous Posts:

Pointy Headed Pundits Can't Make Local Control Go Away
"First, Kill All The School Boards"

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Miller's paean to Nixon was just plain weird (and historically inaccurate) (http://www.shermandorn.com/mt/archives/002854.html).

Oops -- Typepad messed up the URL, which should be http://www.shermandorn.com/mt/archives/002854.html

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