About this blog Subscribe to this blog

NCLB NEWS: "No Bobby Left Behind"

Kudos to blog contributor John Thompson for digging up this episode of King of the Hill, which -- perhaps a media first -- doesn't just reference NCLB once or twice.  It focuses on the law for an entire half-hour episode, and is amusing for both critics and advocates of the law:

In the episode, Bobby's principal is under pressure to make AYP and decides -- falsely, by the way -- that he can just reclassify Bobby and some other lower-scoring kids as special needs to avoid having to try and get them to pass the test.  For a while, this harebrained strategy seems to work and is enjoyed by all.  But then, alas, it turns out that reclassification won't fly. 

Comments

TrackBack URL for this entry:
https://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e54f8c25c9883401053682539d970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference NCLB NEWS: "No Bobby Left Behind":

Permalink

Permalink URL for this entry:
https://scholasticadministrator.typepad.com/thisweekineducation/2008/12/nclb-news-no-bo.html

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

www.debrennersmith.blogspot.com

It is really is sad that some teachers and principals feel this much pressure.

I remember when the episode first aired in early-mid November. As a future special education teacher, I was floored at not only the fact that Bobby was put into a special needs class without any testing or parental involvement, but by the fact that a secondary special needs classroom looks like a daycare/preschool. I realize that most people outside of education have never heard of an IEP or IDEA, and that King of the Hill is just a show (one that I like, by the way). I'm not mad at the show or anything, and I don't think special education is too serious to joke about. But I guess the episode shows what most people think of special education in this country.

at least they didn't try and reclassify bobby as a minority in order to get him out of a reportable subgroup

The comments to this entry are closed.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in This Week In Education are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.