About this blog Subscribe to this blog

Quotes: Ravitch's De Facto Clinton Endorsement

Quotes2This internecine warfare is not admirable. It should stop. It helps Trump. One candidate will emerge from the Democratic convention in Philadelphia. It will be the candidate who gets the requisite number of delegates. It will be either Bernie Sanders or Hillary Clinton. When the convention chooses the candidate, I will support that candidate.

- Diane Ravitch (My Choice for President)

AM News: New ESSA Regs, Clinton/Sanders Advisers Debate, Ravitch Endorsement

What do parents need to know to find a good school? New federal rules help California find an answer - LA Times ow.ly/wbWG300E3Yg

Education Department proposes rules for judging schools - The Washington Post ow.ly/6Seb300E2Zw

AP: Rules proposed for school accountability | U.S. News | US News ow.ly/FD5c300Cngd

Education Department Releases ESSA Accountability Rules - Politics K-12 - Education Week ow.ly/63Oi300E37k

Advisers to Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders Debate Education Policy - Politics K-12 - Education Week ow.ly/dtt2300Dprj

See also: Clinton, Sanders Higher Education Policies Similar - Diverse ow.ly/awgQ300Dpkj

Calling for end to "internecine warfare" among Dems, Ravitch announces she will support the Democratic nominee ow.ly/uZMR300CogP

Inside The College That Abolished The F And Raked In The Cash buzzfeed.com

How 3 top New Orleans public schools keep students out | NOLA.com pllqt.it/FaZEta

In #CharterSchool Era, Montessori Model Flourishes - EdWeek bit.ly/1TYOg9U

In Texas, new math standards look a whole lot like Common Core - The Hechinger Report  ow.ly/YxOU300E3Ba

Facing potential economic downturn, LA Unified considers financial future | EdSource ow.ly/oPM7300E3m7

Quotes: Let's Focus On Schools (Forests), Not Teachers (Trees), Says Kingsland

Quotes2It takes an exceptional teacher to marginally increase a student’s test score, and these gains fade out quickly. It takes an average urban charter school to increase a student’s test score, and these gains increase over time.  Lastly, test scores aren’t everything, so we should be cautious in how we use them and we should give strong deference to parental choice.

-- Arnold Foundation's Neerav Kingsland [Missing the Schools for the Teachers (the Folly of the Teacher Wars)]

Quotes: Clinton, Unions, & "Bringing Back Labor"

Quotes2Of the candidates, Clinton seems the least fulsome in promising a return to the lost workers’ paradise (which may be the reason many rank-and-file union members don’t support her). But with her standing among white men already at rock bottom, Clinton would be loath to say that the U.S. doesn’t need stronger unions so much as a more modern version of unionism that benefits everyone, not just those willing to pay union dues, to lift the economy.
-- Paula Dwyer in Bloomberg View (Bringing Back Labor, Without the Unions)

 

Quotes: The "Emerging Alliance" Between Teachers Unions & Republicans

Quotes2The emerging alliance between teachers unions and Republicans runs against decades of built-up cultural distrust. But the interests of the two partners are closely aligned...[And it's] not the first instance of this alliance in action.

- NY Mag's Jonathan Chait (Who’s Blocking Obama From Helping Poor Schools?)

Teachers: The Wisdom Of The Cool Substitute

Some of the advice is a bit dated, and -- it has to be said -- Ryan Gosling may no longer be the heartthrob he once was -- but it's still good stuff. Anyone else remember "Hey, New Teacher"?

ESSA: The Obama Rule, A Clinton Quandary, & "Daylighted" Data To Come*

32c5404fd0

Curious about the ESSA funding debate but not sure where to start or why to care? Let me see if I can help sort the substantive, political, and other aspects of the story out for you -- and point you towards and even more obscure part of ESSA that may make the current debate moot.

As you may already know, Senator Alexander and several education groups (including the teachers unions) are strongly opposed to an ESSA rule that the Obama education department has developed. No doubt, requiring districts to document equitable funding outcomes for Title I schools would require a series of changes for states and districts.

In extremely simplified terms, the Obama rule would require that states and districts show that they weren't spending more money on poorer schools* than less poor ones. Complying with the requirement could result in large-scale transfers of teachers, cutting of programs at middle-poverty schools, and other unwanted outcomes.

In establishing this requirement, the Obama rule goes against the flow of play these days, which under ESSA generally limits the USDE's role in overseeing the states and districts and how they use roughly $15 billion a year in federal education funding. According to ESSA, districts are relieved of having to identify specific services as supplemental and the USDE is specifically prohibited from requiring a “specific methodology” for distributing state and local funds.

Ed Week has covered this a number of times, including these two pieces (Education Secretary Advocates Robust ESSA Rules Amid GOP BacklashReport to Congress: Proposed Spending Rules Appear to Exceed ESSA Language). An NPR story this morning (The 'Intolerable' Fight Over School Money) adds that Senator Alexander has told states to resist this regulation if it isn't changed or stopped through other means. A NYT piece by New America's Kevin Carey (Why There’s an Uproar Over Trying to Increase Funding for Poor Schools) tells the backstory and makes the case in favor of the Obama position.

During a phone interview earlier this morning, Carey explained that the crafty folks at the USDE decided that the new law didn’t block them from requiring states to document comparable outcomes, as long as they didn’t meddle in the methods. “It’s a new and very different interpretation of the ‘supplement, not supplant’ rule,” according to Carey – but not an unjustifiable one. (On Twitter, economist Bruce Baker took issue with Carey's analysis, and the original headline of the piece [Why Poor Districts Receive Less Government School Funding Than Rich Ones] was quickly changed.) 

It comes down to semantics, really. If ESSA bans the USDE from establishing any specific method of allocating funding, does that also mean that it can’t require the resulting amounts to be equitable?

Nine Democratic Senators (including Senator Sanders and Senator Warren) are supporting the Obama position. A group of civil rights organizations is also supportive. 

We still don't know where Senator Murray and Hillary Clinton stand on the issue -- I've asked the Clinton campaign and will let you know when they respond. 

It’s worth adding that the Obama administration has made regular use of whatever flexibility it can find in federal law in the past. The 2009 Race to the Top initiative, the SIG program, and the NCLB waiver program all stretched – or perhaps broke – the limits of the USDE’s statutory and regulatory powers.

In pushing ahead with this ESSA rule the Obama administration could be seen as creating problems for the Clinton campaign. It certainly isn't taking a backseat and giving the presumptive nominee as much maneuvering room as possible. 

Even if the USDE blinks first, funding expert Marguerite Roza argues in the Brookings blog that a transparency provision put into the law by Senator Bennet is going to end up having much the same effect (More equitable spending on its way regardless of rulemaking). 

Roza argues that, when differentials between schools are finally published, it will become difficult for lawmakers to continue doing what they've done for so long:

"When the spending data are daylighted, the evidence will be clear that many districts have hardwired systematic spending inequities in their operations.... School boards will have no choice but to do the hard work of rethinking longstanding policies that contributed to the uneven spending."

*Correction: The original version stated poorer districts, not schools.

Charts: Teachers Estimate Time Spent On State & District Testing

F4A_Teacher-estimated_time_per_year_spent_preparing_students_for_mandated_tests (1)From CEP.

 

Afternoon Video: The Silencing Effect Of Teacher Hero/Villain Rhetoric

 I'm not exactly sure what the news hook was here - Teacher Appreciation Week, maybe? -- but here's a May 3rd Vox video of former education reporter Dana Goldstein (now at The Marshall Project) talking about outsized demands the public and policymakers demand of teachers, rhetorically at least.

In other places, Goldstein has argued that there has been a "moral panic" about veteran classroom teachers, in which they are vilified and end up leaving the field. You can read about that here: At AFT Conference, Goldstein Compares Reform Efforts To "Moral Panic"Goldstein Compares Current Teacher Fears To 1980s' Welfare Fears

There are certainly examples of teachers being called on to do superhuman work, or denounced for the failures of a handful. But the rhetoric certainly goes both ways (hero and villain), and I'm not sure that these extremes are taken very seriously by policymakers or the public.

There may be some cumulative effect of the repeated assertion, however -- and the unfortunate effect of silencing pragmatic debate over improving teaching. 

Events: Another Week, Another Education Summit

13220940_10154181531906057_7788466886266046669_n

"At the second annual Education Summit, The Atlantic will illuminate the most pressing debates in the education world today, from cradle to college," says the promo copy for Education Summit 2016. It start tomorrow morning and continues Wednesday, in DC. Topics under discussed are listed as ESSA, Common Core, School to Prison Pipeline, Speech on College Campuses, and College Affordability. Speakers and panelists include Jen Holleran, executive director of Startup:Education (part of the Chan Zuckerberg effort). The Atlantic's education editor, Alia Wong, will also participate. Hashtag? Livestream? LMK. 

Afternoon Video: Highlights From NSVF Summit

#nsvfsummit New Schools Venture Fund Summit 2016 Highlight: Dr. Manuel Pastor, Brittany Packnet, and Jose Patiño from NewSchools Venture Fund on Vimeo.

Map: Virtual Schools In Most States Have "Unacceptably Low" Graduation Rates

Morning Video: "Walk-Ins" Get Broadcast Media Coverage

From last week: "Across Boston and around the country, thousands of educators, parents and students—along with our community allies—gathered in close to 80 cities on May 4 to demonstrate support for the public schools all our students deserve—public schools that have the resources to provide every student with a world-class education. In the face of increasing threats to our public education system, these "walk-ins" showed support." via AFT.

#EDgif Of The Day: Google's Lovely Teacher Appreciation Doodle

I am bound and determined to bring GIFs and short videos to education-land, and here's a good start to the week I think. Via TIME magazine.

Quotes: A New Era In Education Philanthropy?

Quotes2Signs abound that this era of polarization is giving way to a different and more constructive phase in U.S. efforts to boost student achievement.... The dawn of a new era of K-12 philanthropy .... Funders [like Walton and Broad] are no longer the dominant drivers.

Inside Philanthropy's David Callahn (The New Era of K-12 Philanthropy)

Teachers: President Obama Remembers His 5th Grade Teacher

A nice message and picture from earlier in the week, in case you missed it (like I did). Via Larry Ferlazzo. 

Charts: Inter-District Racial Segregation Is The Real [Much Harder] Problem, Folks

Screen Shot 2016-05-05 at 4.50.36 PM

So much of the recent attention towards school segregation has focused on within-district segregation, which makes sense. Gentrification, attendance zone boundaries, immigration, and other factors all play a role there, and are relatively easily understood and at least theoretically addressed by a single school district or mayoral agency.  

But as USC's Ann Owens explained at last week's #EWA16 event, the most segregation takes place between different districts.

One reason this may garner less attention is that it makes it harder to consider what the solutions might be when two semi-autonomous public agencies are involved, and one of them is probably much better-off than the other. Consolidating districts? Good luck with that. Transfer agreements between districts? NCLB called for those but generated precious few actual transfers.

Interested in more about media coverage of segregation? Check out my column at The Grade about the surge in coverage, and some possible problems it raises.

Credit Ann Owens and sources listed.

 

Morning Video: Late-Night TV Returns To Teaching

 

Here's Seth Myers talking about Teacher Appreciation Week and the Detroit teachers sick-out. Via Valeria Strauss. Meantime, Chicago teachers seem to be backing off their move towards a second strike.

AM News: Chicago Teachers Back Off Strike Threat

Chicago Teachers Union Decides Against Taking Strike Vote - ABC News ow.ly/4ns5r5 See also Tribune

Online Testing in Georgia Disrupted by Glitches - Market Brief ow.ly/4nqKHP

N.J. revises, renames Common Core academic standards | NJ.com ow.ly/4ns5Qa

School-related civil rights complaints surgeow.ly/4ns5P7

Chancellor Encourages Schools to 'Re-Brand' Better - WNYC ow.ly/4ns5Rv

Zuckerberg and Chan Hire Education Leader to Run Philanthropic Effort - The New York Times ow.ly/4ns5Df See also EdWeek

Garfield High choir teacher placed on leave | The Seattle Times ow.ly/4ns5Cs

How Much Does It Cost To Educate A Student In Michigan? (Or, In The U.S.?) : NPR ow.ly/4ns5eq

Morning Video: President Honors National Teacher Of The Year

It's hard not to feel the love in the room watching the last Obama teacher celebration, via PBS News. Click the link to see a great picture of Jahana Hayes celebrating being named NTOY. Or watch the NBC News version of the event here.

Cartoons: School Seating Chart Generates Controversy

This "School Seating Chart" being shared around on Twitter and Facebook has proven to be somewhat controversial, generating a hashtag and alternative charts such as this one.

Afternoon Video: New Play About Teachers At A Closing Chicago School

Watch some snippets from a Chicago play about a closing school that seems to take place in a teachers' lounger (The Last Days of a Chicago Public School) via WNYC.

Quotes: NJ Gov. Christie Back To Bashing Baraka

Quotes2As the mayor knows, the demand for public charter schools grows every year in his city...Unfortunately, the mayor pursues policies which look to close the doors of new or expanded public charter schools to Newark families in order to pursue his pro-union political agenda. The state will stop him from doing so.

- NJ Governor Chris Christie (Christie calls Baraka funding criticisms part of 'pro-union' agenda)

Quotes: NYC's Publicly Funded Preschool Expansion Looks A Lot Like A Voucher Program

Quotes2Observers and policymakers refer easily to New York’s pre-K program as part of the “public” education system or at the very least as a “public” education program. Yet vouchers for K-12 private schools are often criticized for “privatizing” public education.

-- James Ryan in Medium (The Largest Voucher Program You’ve Never Heard About)

Campaign 2016: Democrats Fighting Over [& With] #BlackLivesMatter

Deray mckesson

If all goes as expected, Black Lives Matter activist Deray McKesson (above right) will lose the Baltimore mayoral primary today.
 
But that shouldn't obscure what may be the biggest development of the first half of 2016, which is the uncertain, awkward interactions between the social justice movement BLM and the partisan political systems and players that shape everything from how billions in education funding gets spent to how Congressional districts are created.  
 
Even assuming McKesson loses, this Mother Jones article notes that BLM has backed winning candidates in other races.

There's no doubt that BLM has burst onto the scene like a much-anticipated Beyonce album. Just the other day, President Obama -- sounding somewhat out of tune given the detailed proposals of Project Zero -- criticized BLM for too much yelling and not enough engagement. 

Everybody wants to ally with BLM -- from Sanders and Clinton to teachers and school reformers -- at least most of the time.

But it isn't at all clear where the fit is going to last and (so far at least) BLM leaders haven't fractured or joined forces with any particular stakeholder group -- labor, education reform, the Democratic Party establishment, or Bernie Sanders liberals. 

McKesson, with his school reform background, has raised suspicions among some labor activists and progressives who might otherwise be eager to join with the social justice leader.

But for union and other leaders it's hard to figure out how to be with and against BLM leaders at the same time, or to come up with any coherent approach.

In recent weeks, there have been some fascinating, seemingly illustrative run-ins between BLM and existing advocacy groups like the Chicago Teachers Union.

In case you missed it, the CTU invited BLM to join a rally a few weeks ago, then struggled to figure out what to do when BLM's Page May started denouncing the police -- a union local -- from the event podium.

"The CTU keeps acting like they are on our side, but then Karen Lewis refuses to say cops need to get out of schools," May said in the DNA Info story. "Until they come out explicitly opposed to cops in schools, I don't think we are fighting on the same side."

Adsfadsfads34

Read more about that in this excellent Laura Moser piece from Slate (Chicago Teachers Union is going through an awkward radicalization).

According to this American Prospect story, local BLM activists were part of the one-day CTU walkout.  And indeed they were there. But obviously CTU and the local BLM weren't really on the same page -- creating a conflict with the union that represents police officers.

When called on to apologize to the police for the rally comments, one CTU ally defiantly Tweeted "CTU can apologize once the [police union] apologizes for supporting & fundraising 100k for [police officer] Van Dyke who killed our CPS student."

A top CTU official distanced the union from the comments.

At roughly the same time, McKesson was indicating his support in the form of a raised fist emoji: 

How this is going to resolve is anybody's guess. BLM could implode or fade, like so many previous groups. It could splinter, or it could find an ally with one or several of the existing combatants out there.

The conundrum is just as much a challenge to education reform groups and Democratic Party traditionalists as it is to the CTU or progressives.

And of course much of the outcome will be shaped by BLM itself.

    Quotes: The Real Struggle Behind Common Core Debate

    Quotes2It’s not that the kids couldn’t do it. But it was so much more difficult for teachers to teach, and it took longer to teach these deeper concepts.

    - Texas teacher Shanna Peeples, reflecting on year as USDE Ambassador, in Deseret News (Last year’s Teacher of the Year shares thoughts)

    TV: That *Awful* Charter School Finale From "Togetherness"

    I didn't hate finale of "Togetherness" as much as some folks -- or for the same reasons -- but the show certainly was a reminder that we should all be careful for what we wish for.

    With "Togetherness," I think I may have finally learned my lesson.

    For years, I've been hectoring my friends about the need for more and better depictions of schools in popular media, and celebrating the appearance of education wherever it might show up ("Parenthood," anyone?). 

    But Season Two of "Togetherness" got deeply into the issue as a major plotline, and it was disappointing to see how superficial and unrealistic the result turned out to be. 

    In Salon (The empty charter school dream), Sonia Saraiya traces the show from Season One to Season Two in ways that I find familiar. "For a show that can be so self-aware about marital dynamics and Hollywood culture, the charter school subplot is a glaring blind spot, one that is given more and more screentime as the season progresses."

    There were moments during Season Two that rang true: the uncomfortably fancy charter school fundraiser, the hilariously cliche'd curriculum (except it should have been a "forest" school , no?), the over-educated and clueless white parents thinking that creating and running a school is a lot easier than it is.

    But this recap (Everything Changes) makes clear how ridiculous things get by the end: "Michelle gets an idea to save the school: an educational theater show that is built by the kids. All they need to do is … tear everything down and rebuild it under the guidance of Sophie. Cut to the construction montage."

    Related posts: Oh, No! Girls' Lena Dunham Is Going To Be A TeacherThe origins of the LA schools storyline on 'Togetherness'New TV Series Features Immature Teachers.

    Quotes: DCPS Henderson Cites Bush's "Soft Bigotry" Line

    Quotes2Far too many adults are empathetic and sympathetic to our young people and they want to cut them some slack and in fact that is the worst this you can do for kids who are struggling or kids who are behind or kids who come from vulnerable families.... That’s absolutely wrong. The reason why the Common Core is important and has very real implications around race and class is what former President Bush referred to as the ‘soft bigotry of low expectations.’ When we hold kids to high expectations they rise to them.

    - DCPS head Kaya Henderson in WAMU segment (Teachers In D.C, Maryland Keep Up The Pressure As PARCC Season Is Upon Us)

    People: Don't Know Who Keron Blair Is? You Should.

     

    CREDIT: KERON BLAIR/FACEBOOK

     
    Meet Keron Blair, described as the Organizer Behind Education Protests Sweeping The Country in this ThinkProgress piece. I've been following him and the coalition he helps organize, AROS (Alliance to Reclaim Our Schools). AROS puts out the useful "This Week In Education Organizing" email. They were at NPE in North Carolina a couple of weekends ago. They're organization another round of Walk-Ins on 5/4 (next week). Details here.

     

    Morning Video: "EduShyster" Vs. EduShyster

    Last weekend in North Carolina, Jennifer Berkshire and Peter Cunningham talked education at the NPE conference. Watch it above. Note how close to the door Cunningham has arranged to sit. Read his reflections on the experience here

    Afternoon Video: GA Teacher's Response To Prince's Death Goes Viral

    This video has been going around all over the place. I'm sure this isn't the only instance -- just one caught on video. #RIPPrince.

    Teachers: AFT Apologizes For #RIPPrince Tweet (But What About That Silver Support Letter?)

    At least a couple of folks found an AFT #RIPPrince tweet objectionable.

    "Are you kidding? Exploiting #RIPPrince for political gains? Wow," wrote former MinnPost reporter Beth Hawkins (now with EdPost). And later: "You hear Prince & think "Hate use of data in education?"

    After a couple of attempts to explain itself, @AFTTeach (one of several AFT-related Twitter handles) wrote last night "apologies no offense or joke intended."

    To be fair, there was no shortage of #RIPPrince abuse going on yesterday, including Broadway shows with mid-performance Prince homages and a Spike Lee block party. 

    If there was something truly objectionable coming out of the AFT yesterday, it might have been AFT head Randi Weingarten's plea for leniency on behalf of disgraced New York politico Sheldon Silver.

    She was joined in writing the court by former NYC Mayor David Dinkins. 

    Quotes: Parents Need To Ask Tougher Questions To Combat Misperceptions

    Quotes2Build deeper relationships and ask tougher questions of your student's teachers...Instead of the teacher just saying, 'He's a great kid,' ask, 'Is he reading on grade level?' 

    -- Bibb Hibbard in NPR (9 Out Of 10 Parents Think Their Kids Are On Grade Level. They're Probably Wrong)

    Quotes: The Possibilities Of The Post-NCLB Era

    Quotes2A dark cloud has just been lifted off the country. No Child Left Untested just blew away in smoke. We have not yet embraced those possibilities.

    - NEA head Lily Eskelsen Garcia via NPR via Greg Toppo

    People: Catching Up With Uber-Teacher Larry Ferlazzo

    image from blogs.scholastic.com
     
    If you haven't already gotten to know about Larry Ferlazzo, well, I don't know what to do with you at this point. The prolific Sacramento teacher/blogger is everywhere online, and has been so for several years now. I've written about him several times in the past here. 
     
    And yet I have to admit I learned some new things talking to him for Scholastic Administrator (Catching Up With Larry Ferlazzo) including that he used to be a labor organizer and that he's still playing league basketball. He's also got interesting thoughts about ELL instruction, handling a large workload, and federal education policy. Favorite Ferlazzo response: "Sometimes the only thing worse than losing a power struggle is winning one."
     

    Charts: Rise Of Special Ed Students

    EdWeek charts uptick in kids with IEPs after long-running declines.

    Charts: There Many Different Kinds Of Homeless Students In Schools

    More than 1 million kids lack a home of their own -- many doubled up with other families. Via Ben Spielberg & the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

    Quotes: Public Charter Schools Claiming Private Status When Teachers Organize

    Quotes2We've decided that when teachers really want a voice, to just organize under whatever law is operational... But then as soon as we start organizing, these same charter operators who in one breath say it's a public school, in the other breath say when it comes to school teachers, it's private, not public.

    AFT head Randi Weingarten in Bloomberg BNA (Charter School Teachers Organizing Under Federal Labor Law)

    Morning Video: Maryland Contemplates Testing Reductions

    AM News: EdSec Touts Arts & Sciences, Minn. Tenure Law Challenged

    Education Secretary John King: It's Time To Stop Ignoring The Arts And Sciences ow.ly/10EBxt

    Suit accuses Minnesota of protecting bad teachers at students' expense -StarTribune.com ow.ly/10EBZ1

    Teacher Tenure Is Challenged Again in a Minnesota Lawsuit - The New York Times ow.ly/10EAmN

    In San Juan, San Jose and Poway, districts & unions innovate to evaluate teachers | EdSource ow.ly/10EBFr

    New York considering using scores on AP exams and SAT subject tests in evaluations | Chalkbeat ow.ly/10EByM

    These 3 California school districts allow staff to pack guns to work - LA Times ow.ly/10EBB9

    The Trump Effect': Hatred, Fear And Bullying On The Rise In Schools ow.ly/10EBDC

    Broadway's 'Hamilton' Makes Its Way Into NYC's High School Curriculum : NPR ow.ly/10EAor

    Balloon ‘spacecraft,’ prosthetic limbs and subway vacuums thrill White House science fair wpo.st/ZCKU1

     

    #edGIF Of The Day: "Why Is Being Educated Considered A 'White Thing'"?

    One of BuzzFeed's latest videos, purportedly about questions black people want to ask other black people, has generated reactions ranging from 😬 to 😡.

    One of the questions is a version of the age-old "acting white" issue, which Vox debunked not too long ago: The most insidious myth about black kids and achievement

    Seriously, some people are really offended by the attempted humor. For example: 27 Answers To Buzzfeed’s Dumb Video. This is probably where I should provide a trigger warning. 

    Related posts: Why Do Journalists Love Shaky Science on Race? Eduwonkette; How Barack Obama's Election Can Change the Myth of 'Acting White' NY Mag.

     

    Events: NYU "Politics Of Privatization" Summit [#PoPNonCon16] Going On Now

    image from 2f4bc62sl54p25xk8ry2ld34.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com
    In case you haven't seen it, there's a "Non-Conference" on Privatization in Education at NYU going on this week.

    According to the website, discussants will include education historian and NYU Steinhardt research professor Diane Ravitch; and union leaders Lily Eskelsen García of the National Education Association and Randi Weingarten of the American Federation of Teachers.

    The hashtag is #PoPNonCon16. The livestream is here.

    Apparently, there's a Bernie Sanders rally going on across the street.

     

     

    Morning Video: Meet DFER Head Shavar Jeffries

    In case you didn't know, former Newark board member and mayoral candidate Shavar Jeffries now heads DFER. He was the afternoon keynote at the Yale SOM education conference last week, and spoke to The Seventy Four.

    Or, watch Steve Harvey interview a 5 year old math genius.

    #edGIF Of The Day: The Harsh Truth About Speed-Reading

    tdd-speed-reading-apps
     
    "For a long time, people have claimed to be able to read very quickly without any loss of comprehension — and many have claimed to teach this amazing skill."
    From Kernel (The harsh truth about speed-reading).
     

    Quotes: At Friday Event, Clinton Touts "Balanced" Approach To Testing

    Quotes2I want every teacher, principal, parent and student to know you will have a partner in the White House... Recruiting and retaining effective teachers starts with something very basic, raising teacher pay... Let’s keep working to find a fair balanced approached to testing so our kids learn what they need to compete...

    -- Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton in New York on Friday via Newsday (Clinton touts economic agenda in Buffalo, Rochester) Last week, her husband raised some eyebrows with his suggestion that Clinton didn't support annual testing (see also NYT).  See full speech transcript here.

    AM News: Clinton Addresses NY Teachers, Philly Labor Leaders

    Hillary Clinton touts economic agenda in Buffalo, Rochester | Newsday

    Clinton Stumps for Friendly Union Faces in Pennsylvania - Courthouse News 

    Why Talented Black and Hispanic Students Can Go Undiscovered - The New York Times

    Black and Latino parents want better teachers and harder classes for their kids - LA Times

    Some Parents Of Color Don't Think Schools Are Even Trying To Educate Their Children

    Criminal hackers now target hospitals, police stations and schools - LA Times

    How One School Under Pressure Resists 'Test Prep' - WNYC

    Why Teachers on TV Have to Be Incompetent or Inspiring - The New York Times

     

    School Police: San Antonio Girl Slammed To Ground

    The latest in a string of videos featuring school police acting in a deeply unsettling way, now trending on social media. 

    Quotes: Black Superintendent Reacts To "Jim Crow" Accusation From White Protesters

    Quotes2I’m not going to stand by while someone who doesn’t look like me accuses me of carrying out some form of Jim Crow... I teach my own kids that no one can take your dignity and only you can control your temper. I tell them that I know who I am. I know my history.

    - Oakland superintendent Antwan Wilson quoted in this SF Chronicle column (Superintendent gets schooled in Oakland’s turbulent politics)

    AM News: Opt-Outs, DCTU Victory, Teachers Vs. Police?

    Opt-Outs Persist as Exams Begin Across New York - WSJ

    Teachers union touts victory in evaluation fight - The Washington Post

    FOP want Chicago Teachers Union to condemn rally comments to 'F--- the police' | Chicago Sun-Times

    Besieged teachers unions reach out to their members | EdSource

    Taking High School Courses In College Costs Students And Families Nearly $1.5 Billion : NPR Ed : NPR

    Arne Duncan On Chicago: 'I Didn't Think It Could Get Worse, But It Has' - Chicago

    New York Teen Accepted To All 8 Ivy League Colleges

    CPS Tells Kids They Got Into Coveted School, Takes It Back - Old Town - Chicago

    Update: The Teach For America Reboot (Goes Beyond Corps Member Diversity)

    6a00e54faaf86b883301b7c82e1c49970b-800wi

    Here's my latest Scholastic Administrator column, about the Teach for America Reboot: "The controversy surrounding TFA may have been helpful, in the end. As Villanueva Beard told Politico, “'I’m grateful for when people make our shortcomings clear, because it enables us to get better.'” 

    Advertisement

    Advertisement

    Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in This Week In Education are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.