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Charts: Within-District Racial Segregation May Surprise You

From Brookings.

Quotes: About Those Grad Rates...

Funding: State, Local, & Federal Spending Still Lags

Charts: What Happened To Wisconsin & Vermont's Grad Rates?

AM News: Tonight's Debate, Labor Funding, State Grad Rates, & More

Where Donald Trump And Hillary Clinton Stand On 10 Policy Issues [including education] : NPR  ow.ly/OSZJ305j8km

Labor funding to outside political groups increases 38% as part of an effort to boost Clinton - WSJ  ow.ly/NFTv305ktTT

Which States Have Seen the Most Progress (or None at All) on Graduation Rates? - Education Week  ow.ly/iKvK305kv36

L.A. Unified decides fate of six charter schools; El Camino leader resigns latimes.com/local/educatio…

Gary Solomon pleads guilty to fraud in Chicago schools bribery case hosted.ap.org/dynamic/storie…

3 Students Shot Outside San Francisco High School: Police abcnews.go.com/US/students-sh…

UNO teachers, Chicago charter network avert strike - Chicago Tribune ow.ly/6VO3305kvYn

U.S. Minority Students Less Exposed to Computer Science gallup.com/poll/196307/mi…

Texas House Digging in Heels for School Voucher Fight kut.org/post/texas-hou…

Nike Co-Founder Phil Knight Gives $500 Million for University of Oregon Science Center - WSJ ow.ly/NbB4305kwlM
Parent Group Seeks More Integration in New York’s Schools nytimes.com/2016/10/19/nyr…
Group Urges Moving Popular School in Manhattan Rezoning Fight - WSJ ow.ly/je5A100mFaS

Quotes: You Think Fixing Education Is Hard? Try Poverty.

Quotes2So is the answer to address concentrated poverty? Sure. Except that, if anything, attempts to address poverty have a worse track record than attempts to improve education. Hell, attempts to address poverty have such a bad track record that even credulous pundits rarely bother writing about it anymore. Nobody really seems to have any compelling answers, and for about 90% of the country it's just too easy to ignore the problem entirely. 

Kevin Drum, in Mother Jones (2010) Schools and Poverty


Quotes: No One Is Going To "Disrupt" Teachers Anyway

Quotes2Personalized education? OK, maybe. But don’t tell me you want your kids brought up in a classroom without teachers... No one is going to disrupt teachers away. Teaching is probably the most difficult of all current jobs for an AI to manage. 

-- Hank Green in Medium (You Can’t Fix Education)

Quotes: Unfocused, Ego-Driven Ventures Undo & Discredit Education Investments

Quotes2Time and again in education, big-name investors have launched companies with the broadest ambitions, only to be undone by more-focused players...The benefits of a national footprint are seldom as obvious. Yet it is national scale that many ventures have sought. That failure, repeated so consistently, has given credible fodder to people who resist the active participation of for-profit enterprises in the educational sphere.
Jonathan Knee in The Atlantic (Why For-Profit Education Fails)

"Evicted" Author Talks About Housing's Impact On Poor Students & Education

image from www.nybooks.com
The connections between housing and education are no secret at this point.

Earlier this week, New York media outlets including the NYT noted that homeless children have higher absentee rates because they’re trying to travel to schools that aren’t close to the shelters to which they’ve been assigned.

A recent Washington Post article noted “the remarkable thing that happens to poor kids when you help their parents with rent. Researchers speculate that parents who don’t have to worry about paying private-sector rents “might have more time to spend on their children — helping them with their homework, keeping them out of trouble and guiding them to a more successful adulthood.”

Even years after the Great Recession, districts like Sacramento are seeing spikes in homeless children.

Matthew Desmond’s much-discussed book, Evicted, makes the connection all too clear. Desmond was recently named to Politico’s 50. As you may recall, I wrote about Desmond last month.

In a recent Housing Matters interview, Desmond described the impact of evictions this way: “People lose their communities. Kids lose their schools…They move into neighborhoods with higher crime rates. They also relocate to housing that has more housing problems.”

In The Atlantic, Desmond notes “We value fairness in this country. We value equal opportunity. Without a stable home, those ideals really fall apart. Without the ability to plant roots and invest in your community or your school… eviction becomes something of an inevitability to you.”

In a recent phone interview, Desmond emphasized the housing-school connections in his work. The relationship between housing and education is “huge for me,” said Desmond, and keeps coming up on his book tour. 

“I remember I was in Phoenix a few months ago and a teacher stood up and told me that 40 percent of her students who start the year with her will not be there the last week of school. She said, ‘Before reading your book, I never knew why.’”

It's not that poor families want to move as much as they end up moving. These families would love to keep their children in the same school, but are often unable to do so. Poor families spending well north of 50 percent of their income on rent are vulnerable to eviction, which requires them to move suddenly even if it’s the middle of the school year. 

This level of churn is far from desirable. “If we want more family and school stability, we need a lot fewer evictions,” said Desmond.

Making matters worse, evicted families generally move into worse neighborhoods and worse housing, which generally have lower-performing schools.  

In between between evictions, children from poor families live in overcrowded conditions that have direct effects on their ability to do well in school. One of the families Desmond profiled in his book was far too crowded and noisy to allow children to do homework, he recalled.

Of course, high housing costs are also affecting teachers directly, making it difficult for them to afford housing in some places.

Desmond also reports that some middle and high school teachers are teaching the book as part of units on poverty and homelessness. “I’ve been thrilled to hear from high school students around the country that have read the book,” he said. “It’s been a pleasant surprise.”

And the impact on parents’ ability to support their children’s school success should not be underestimated, according to Desmond. “We have to come to terms with all the bandwidth that this crisis is sucking out of parents minds,” he said. “If I was a mom spending 80 percent of income on rent, facing inevitable eviction, I don’t think I’d have that extra brainpower to think about school lotteries or magnets schools.”

Quotes: Why Voluntary Integration Might Not Scale

Quotes2I think voluntary [integration] is great, but the number of school districts that are willing to take this on? ... It's something like 1 percent of school districts in the country are attempting these programs. I don't think that's going to scale much beyond 5 percent or 10 percent unless there is real political will put behind it.

-- ASU's Matt Delmont on NPR (Why Busing Didn't End School Segregation)

Quotes: Duncan Critiques Easy Ed School Honors

Quotes2Either your teacher training programs are attracting an unusually gifted group of students or the standard for honors in education is too low. We know from other studies that it is not the first explanation.

-- Former EdSec Arne Duncan, in Brookings (An open letter to America’s college presidents and education school deans)

Quotes: It Depends On What You Mean By "Teacher Shortage"

Quotes2The key issue is not whether there will be enough warm bodies to enter teaching. The key issue is whether there will be enough well-qualified individuals willing to offer their services in the specific fields and locations that currently lack an adequate supply.

-- Response from researchers at the Learning Policy Institute to questions about their recent teacher shortage study (Teacher Supply and Demand)


Events: What Education Reporters Are Being Told About ESSA

If you want to try and understand how education writers and editors decide to write the stories that they produce -- and how they come out the way they do -- it's good to know what they're being told. (And if you're a savvy education editor or reporter it's also a good thing to know a little about what you're being told.)

For example, later this week in Chicago is the Education Writers Association's mini-conference on The ABCs of ESSA, in which they association will try and make sure that education reporters know about the new federal law and how it's going to be implemented. 

The preliminary schedule of events to be held in Chicago includes appearances from CCSSO's Chris Minnich, LPI's Charmaine Mercer, the Leadership Conference's Liz King, and former EdWeek editor and reporter Erik Robelen (now at EWA). I'm also supposed to be there (as an attendee). 

There are also going to be appearances from the USDE's Emma Vadehra, some discussion about low-performing school interventions (including someone from San Francisco's Mission High), and a panel on great ESSA stories led by NPR's Steve Drummond, Chalkbeat's Scott Elliott, and the Joyce Foundation's Stephanie Banchero. AFT head Randi Weingarten was scheduled to be there -- probably the highest-profile person on the original speakers list -- but she's being replaced by staffer Rob Weil.

Anything notable about the list of topics and attendees? Anyone left out? Education journalism didn't do an entirely stellar job describing NCLB to the public. Ditto for Common Core. Crossed fingers that ESSA training and the subsequent coverage are both strong. 


Quotes: The Fragility Of Integrated Schooling

Quotes2People think we’re better now than we used to be. But we’re not. Those white families in Cleveland are going to flee. 

-- Greenville, Miss. parent and lawyer Kimberly Merchant, in Hechinger Report (The anonymous town that was the model of desegregation in the Civil Rights era)

Quotes: States Swing Back Towards Larger Class Sizes

Quotes2Small classes do provide modest benefits to the students with respect to academic achievement, but the benefits are less strong than being assigned to a particularly effective teacher.

-- Harvard's Martin West, quoted in the Wall Street Journal (Schools Learn Expensive Lesson on Class Size)


Morning Video: Former AG Eric Holder Says Fear Drove Zero-Tolerance School Policies


Here the New York Times looks back at the rise of zero-tolerance discipline policies, going back to Joe Clark, and then takes us to the current wave of restorative justice programs (featuring Furr High School in Houston).

"The concept of zero tolerance has come to encompass such a broad range of disruptive actions that roughly three million schoolchildren are suspended each year... Many students are hauled off to police station houses for antisocial behavior that, a generation or two ago, would have sent them no farther than the principal’s office."

Watch the video to see Eric Holder talk about high school kids as predators back in the 1990s, and admit that the policies and implementation went way too far. Read the accompanying article here.

The series, part of the Times' Retro Reports series, gives a helpful overview, though I wish it pointed out the struggles that some districts are having transitioning from zero tolerance to restorative practices without additional resources for counselors and teacher training. Eliminating zero tolerance isn't as easy as flipping a switch, and trying to do it without care and planning could lead schools right back to some of the same problems as before. 

Charts: Biggest Price Hikes Are Textbooks, Tuition, & Childcare (aka Preschool)

Charts: All About Latino Students

The vast majority of Latino youth are US citizens. Eight out of 10 states with fastest growing Latino populations between 2000-2015 were in the South. Graduation rates are up. All this and more via NCLR's new report #kidsdata. 

Charts: Income & Educational Attainment Over 25 Years

WSJ: "The past 25 years have seen a growing split between households with different levels of educational attainment. The median household led by someone with a master’s degree earns $7,655 more per year than in 1991. Those with some college, but no degree, earn $7,768 less and those with a high-school diploma but no further education earn $6,316 less." (U.S. Poverty and Income Inequality in 9 Charts - Real Time Economics)


Charts: OECD Report Shows US Lagging On Education Spending

Screen Shot 2016-09-16 at 12.21.08 PMPBS NewsHour: Are U.S. children getting the best education for the dollar? 

Numbers: School Closings Are Neither Popular Nor Common

Closings by year
A recent PDK International poll reported that American's don't like it when schools get closed. They much prefer troubled schools get new leadership and/or staff. Eighty-four percent of the public prefers fixing struggling schools while just 14 percent want to close them.
But school closings, while they can be traumatic for students and educators who have remained at a school, aren't as common as you may think -- and even when they happen they don't necessarily mean a building is being shuttered. As noted in this recent opinion piece, the "nuclear" option happens only 1-2 percent of the time, usually after an all-hands-on-deck effort to turn things around and/or dwindling enrollment. 
According to the NCES Fast Facts page, roughly 1,-2,000 of the nation's 99,000 schools have been closed over the years, fluctuating from a low of 1,2000 to a high of 2,200. And of course schools being closed doesn't necessarily mean that a school building is being shuttered. New schools are opened on the same site, or other schools within the same facility are enlarged.

Quotes: Stop Thinking White Parents Will Choose To Integrate Schools

Quotes2All of the choice-based reform efforts that they’ve come up with over the last 20 years have been designed to bring back all the white people who left after Brown v. Board. But the irony is that, if [districts] keep relying on choice, they’re going to be set up for failure because white people will not enroll their children in schools unless they’re already [predominantly] white.

-- Natalie Hopkinson, a black parent and journalist in The Atlantic (How Parents Can Help Desegregate Schools)

People: McKesson, Packnett, Goldrick-Rab, O'Leary, & Desmond

This year's POLITICO 50 includes almost a half-dozen education-related influencers, including Sara Goldrick-Rab, Deray McKesson, Brittany Packnett, Matthew Desmond, and Ann 'Oleary. Read all about them. Desmond is the person who wrote the book about the lives of poor black and white residents of Milwaukee, who are regularly forced to move from one expensive apartment to another. 

Charts: Teachers Really Hate Those Interactive Whiteboards Everybody Bought

chart showing technologies currently in use by survey participants

According to a new survey of teachers reported in THE Journal, interactive whiteboards were the third most-hated category among teachers. (First and second most-hated were mobile phones and desktops.) However, 68 percent of respondents said those are in use at their schools.

Quotes: Gladwell On Charters, Scale, & Timelines

Quotes2You cannot turn around centuries of lack of advantage in a generation. Nobody's ever done that in the history of mankind... We've got to sustain this for 30, 40, 50 years if we're going to see some real change. 

- Malcolm Gladwell via OZY (Why Malcolm Gladwell Is Optimistic About Charter Schools)

Books: How Repeated Evictions Impact Students' Lives

image from www.motherjones.com
Fans of high-quality nonfiction and those concerned about education and segregation should check out Matthew Desmond's pretty amazing book, Evicted, out earlier this year.

Focusing on the lives of poor white and black residents of one midsized city (Milwaukee), but making a national case, Desmond shows why poor people tend to move more often, but largely stay within confined geographic areas.

"There is an enormous amount of pain and poverty in this rich land,’ argues American sociologist Desmond in this brilliant book about housing and the lives of eight families in Milwaukee. (Via The Guardian)

The educational impacts of children whose families are moving frequently aren't the focus of the book, but they're ever-present: Lost sleep, changes of schools, going hungry, lack of heat or electricity, and constant worry. Families with children are much more likely to be evicted, notes this Mother Jones article.

The book also shows how academics and policymakers have missed much of what's going on by focusing on relatively small parts of the problem (federal housing vouchers and public housing) rather than larger ones (the private market) most poor renters inhabit.

Last but not least, Evicted shows that it's not just slumlords who are culpable for the deplorable, exploitative situation. The legal system, law enforcement, and even social support agencies all play a role in creating and perpetuating things -- and tolerating what's clearly intolerable. 

AM News: State Testing Study, Detroit Contract Agreement, & More

In Detroit, schools and teachers reach pact ow.ly/dQBd303YzYe

Parents Sue After New York State Denies Money to ‘Failing’ Schools - The New York Times ow.ly/ksdB303YzWu

State Testing Disruptions Likely Produced Dips and Gains in Student Scores, Study Says - Market Brief ow.ly/rOjU303XayY

An Effective but Exhausting Alternative to High School Suspensions nytimes.com/2016/09/11/mag…

Christie blasts teachers union, calls for longer school year during back-to-school event burlingtoncountytimes.com/news/local/chr…

N.J. Gov. Chris Christie Calls Teachers Union 'Mafia,' Signs Education Bills blogs.edweek.org/edweek/state_e…

CTU chief Lewis balks at CPS' request to stop pension benefits | Chicago Sun-Times ow.ly/Z511303XNAI 

On Eve Of Court Hearing, WA Lawmakers Get An Earful On School Funding kuow.org/post/eve-court…

Final ESSA supplanting regs seem to offer a compromise cabinetreport.com/human-resource…
Chicago Schools Open Up With Fewer Staff wbez.org/shows/wbez-new…
New evidence that summer programs can make a difference for poor children  washingtonpost.com/local/educatio…

Quotes: Creating Lots Of Good Teachers Vs. Firing A Few Bad Ones

Quotes2Creating better teachers is more complicated — and more expensive — than claiming we can drastically improve education with pink slips. But in fact, pretty great teachers can be made

- Karin Klein in LA Times Opinion Page (Why firing bad teachers isn't nearly as important as creating good ones)

Numbers: Education Funding Goes Down Even As Enrollments Go Up

Curious why states and districts are so upset with the notion of having to reallocate funding in order to remain eligible for ESSA? According to FiveThirtyEight, state funding has gone down nearly 7 percent since 2008, and student spending over all has gone down over 2 percent during the same period -- even as enrollments have increased (a bit).

Morning Listen: Helping Low-Income Kids Make It To Graduation

Listen to this new hourlong audio documentary from APM Reports (formerly known as American RadioWorks, about "what kids are up against at the growing number of high-poverty schools in America." And look forward to a September 20 event in DC.

AM News: FLOTUS, EdSec, Lead Exposure Research, & More

U.S. education chief to visit New Orleans, Baton Rouge nola.com/education/inde…

Top Clinton advisor Anne O'Leary splits with Goodwin Liu - SFChronicle pllqt.it/4wPwvC

Michelle Obama visits the District’s Howard University with host of NBC’s ‘Late Night’ wpo.st/3g5w1 

Small reductions in children’s lead exposure dramatically improve educational outcomes - Vox pllqt.it/rRZvJY

In Austin Public Schools, a Clear Divide on AP Test Passing Rates | KUT ow.ly/hNfy303Ofrd

Room for compromise as teachers strike vote nears | Chicago Reporter ow.ly/wKyT303P7b0

N.J. triples weight of PARCC results in teacher evaluations | NJ.comow.ly/Zbz4303PQwH

New Jersey Teachers Union Ordered to Court Over Benefit Negotiations blogs.edweek.org/edweek/teacher…
Under New Policy for Homeless Families, Children Can Miss Less School nyti.ms/2bFMpwq
Chicago Public Schools Re-opens South Side Neighborhood High School wbez.org/shows/wbez-new…

Welcome to first grade! Please bring two reams of copy paper with you kuow.org/post/welcome-f…

Morning Video: Why Ohio Leads Nation In Poverty-Segregated School Districts

Above, watch a clean-shaven Cory Turner segment about how Ohio and other non-Southern states have neighboring districts with wildly different poverty levels. 

Or, watch this Emerson Collective video segment about TFA's recruitment of undocumented college students to become classroom teachers.  

Maps: Syrian Refugee Students Placed In Mid-Sized Cities (Boise, Worcester)

Screen Shot 2016-08-31 at 12.03.33 PM

This NYT map and accompanying story (Here’s Where They Went) shows the 231 towns and cities where the 10,000 Syrian refugees accepted into the United States have been settled over the past four years. 

These numbers are tiny compared to what other nations are doing currently or what the US has done in the past with Cuban and Vietnamese refugees, points out the Times.

Big cities like NYC, Chicago, and LA haven't been among the leaders compared to affordable mid-sized citeis. "Boise, Idaho, has accepted more refugees than New York and Los Angeles combined; Worcester, Mass., has taken in more than Boston."

Students in Lancaster, PA are suing the district for providing an inadequate education. School districts on Long Island, NY are being monitored to ensure that they enroll and serve refugee students appropriately. 

"The suit claims district administrators routinely sent older refugee students to a "disciplinary school" that subjected them to bullying, intense security protocols and an accelerated learning program that runs counter to conventional wisdom on the subject."

In Syria, schools have been bombed, forcing children to attend classes in bunkers or to forego an education entirely. For more on the challenge of schooling Syrian refugee children, click here.

Morning Video: "Cultural Competency" Teacher Prep Program Includes Homestay

On PBS last night, a segment about a small seven year-old program in Chicago that attempts to prepare teachers (mostly white) for kids and communities they're likely to teach in (mostly black and brown) -- including a cross-cultural homestay program. Roughly half of Chicago teachers are white, while less than 10 percent of Chicago students are.

AM News: Loosened Teacher Licensing, Vergara Followup, Inadequate Refugee Education, & More

States Loosen Teacher-Licensure Rules Amid Shortage Fears blogs.edweek.org/edweek/teacher…

Despite Vergara Ruling, Teacher-Tenure Battles Set to Heat Up - Education Week ow.ly/WfyH303KTSm

FBI raids home of ex-College Board official in probe of SAT leak | Reuters ow.ly/XgaS303Jlyn

Staunch City Hall critic abandons appeal & resigns as principal of top Chicago school - Chicago Magazine ow.ly/TgME303K1Go

ACLU claims Lancaster PA denies refugees proper education | PhillyVoice pllqt.it/OUxLlL

Finally, a disturbing trend in education shows signs of reversal - LA Times ow.ly/R0xk303KRDj

Why was it the ACLU, not charter school overseers, who called out 'illegal' behaviors? scpr.org/news/2016/08/3…

Mental Health In Schools: A Hidden Crisis Affecting Millions Of Students wamu.org/news/16/08/31/…
Why did Washington's schools get an F in recent test results? kuow.org/post/why-did-w…
Lead Tests on New York City Schools’ Water May Have Masked Scope of Risk - The New York Times ow.ly/bOEB303KVB0

In Chicago, preparing teachers for the classrooms that need them most - NewsHour  feedproxy.google.com/~r/NewshourHea…

Charts: Poll Shows Majority Of Americans & Public School Parents Oppose Opting Out Of Standardize Tests


"Fifty-five percent of public school parents oppose allowing children to sit out standardized tests. Overall, the demographic groups most opposed to the opt-out movement are black people (67 percent) and senior citizens (68 percent)." Results from #PDKPoll via Chalkbeat.

Morning Video: What A Welcoming School Looks Like

Via Larry Ferlazzo: I Wonder How Many Students Experience School As It’s Illustrated In This Video?. The video was apparently produced by the Rollins Center for Language & Literacy at the Atlanta Speech School.


Quotes: How The Recession Might Help Explain Low-Income Kids' Progress

Quotes2One likely explanation for the across-the-board increase in parents’ investing in their young children’s learning is that parents today are just far more aware of the unique importance of the early childhood years in shaping their children’s development... It also may be that the increase in parent-child interactions among low-income families has been driven, in part, by the shift of low-income children out of preschool programs and into parental care during the economic recession.

-- Daphna Bassok, a co-author of the study and professor at the University of Virginia (Despite Growing Income Inequality, Learning Gaps Between Rich And Poor Kids Are Actually Closing)

AM News: Narrowing Gaps, Poll Time, Homework Debate, & More

Surprise! Amid rising inequality, one school gap is narrowing scpr.org/news/2016/08/2…

Low-income kindergartners are closing the achievement gap, reversing a decades-old trend washingtonpost.com/news/education…

Trump’s ‘Education Week’ Calculation: A New Pivot to Woo Reluctant Republicans and Swing State Minorities | The 74 ow.ly/qVKk303FYlU
Poll: Rising Share of Americans Like Their Local Schools ... But There's a Catch blogs.edweek.org/edweek/campaig…
Americans Like Their Schools Just Fine — But Not Yours - NPR ow.ly/aWm7303FWWM
Dozens of Baltimore County Schools Closed for Heat abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/d…
A new school year, and a 204th school, as enrollment surges in Maryland district washingtonpost.com/local/educatio…
As Students Return to School, Debate About the Amount of Homework Rages nytimes.com/2016/08/25/us/…
4 Years After Tragedy, A New Sandy Hook Elementary Prepares To Open Its Doors npr.org/sections/thetw…
From Humans of New York to Obama's Office: How a Principal Built a School - NYT nzzl.us/0kspD5L
Buckeye, Ariz., HS Student Wears 'Black Lives Matter' Shirt, Told to Change - EBONY nzzl.us/zz58IEK

Charts: Teacher Pay Gap Keeps Going Up - Now 23 Percent

According to a new report from EPI, teachers’ weekly wages are now 23 percent lower than those of other college graduates.

Maps: Primary School Teachers Top Some State Job Lists (But Robots...)


The most common profession in many states is truck driver -- a group that could soon lose their jobs to robots, according to Vox. But the most common job in few states including Florida, Alaska and some in New England is primary school teacher -- a notoriously low-paying but abundant job. No news yet on robot primary school teachers. But it's probably coming soon. 

Events: Lots Of Education Discussion At Minority Journalists' Conference

There's lots of education-related panels at the conference in DC going on this week. Check it all out here or scroll through the #NABJNAHJ16 hashtag.

Campaign 2016: Black Kids 500% More Likely To Die From Asthsma

Quotes: Wealthier White Parents Want One Thing, Wealthier Black Parents Another

Quotes2I found middle class and affluent white families organizing to limit access, taking the good teachers, in the principal’s office daily advocating that ‘my kid gets the good programs.’ Wealthy Black families would rather pay their money and send kids to private schools.

- CUNY professor L'Heureux Lewis-McCoy in EWA via Education Post (We Can't Keep Ignoring the Suburbs and the Black People That Live in Them)

Morning Video: Advanced Math Classes Too Much For Most?

"Algebra is a core subject for U.S. high school students. But should it be? Author Andrew Hacker believes we should reconsider how math is taught: only 5 percent of the American workforce actually uses math beyond arithmetic, though higher-level classes are widely required." Via PBS NewsHour

Maps: "Island" (Fortress?) School Districts Isolate Kids By Wealth

Campaign 2016: Yes, Schools Today More Segregated Than 1960s

Quotes: Busing -- Fake Issue, Or Real?

Quotes2Without doubt, “busing” became a charged term during the 1970’s, but calling it fake ignores critical facts about its symbolic meaning. For the vast majority of parents it meant loss of control over where their child went to school. 

- David Armor in Brookings (Why busing was definitely not a fake issue)

AM News: Homeless Students, Refugee Kids, Planning Time, & More

U.S. Education Department issues guidelines for supporting homeless students washingtonpost.com/news/education…

Department of Education issues new guidelines for schools aimed at helping homeless students abcn.ws/2aa1XoD

Camp For Young Refugees Teaches U.S. School Skills wnyc.org/story/young-re…

NCTQ ranks the amount of planning time teachers get in 147 districts | Education Dive ow.ly/gBnV302FJtd

As deadline looms, California struggles to finalize new school accountability system edsource.org/2016/as-deadli…

Chicago Teachers Union, district set to begin fresh round of talks - Chicago Tribune ow.ly/89xJ302G7jf

CPS: Special education programs failing despite higher costs - Chicago Tribune ow.ly/l1xd302Ftsb

LA Unified 'soft-launching' parent website for tracking student attendance, graduation progress scpr.org/news/2016/07/2…

Education policy expert tapped as president of state education board  washingtonpost.com/local/educatio…

New York City Is Taking A Big Step To Keep Young Kids In School  huffingtonpost.com/2016/07/26/new…

How the relationship between L.A. Unified and charter schools is 'like a middle school dance' latimes.com/local/educatio…

Note that there will be no news roundup tomorrow, July 29th. Back again on Monday. 

Charts: DC Schools Improving Faster Than Demographics Predict

image from pbs.twimg.com



Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in This Week In Education are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.