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Quotes: On Being Black Or Brown At A Diverse School

Quotes2If you’re a white student, it is utopia. You get to be around kids of diverse backgrounds, listen to different music, have different experiences, and also get the finest of schools... If you’re a black student, you don’t feel as respected or welcome, you don’t feel like a full citizen.

- Evanston parent John Diamond in last week's Bloomberg story (Black Students Don’t Even Get an Equal Education in Diverse Schools)

Quotes: Stop Thinking White Parents Will Choose To Integrate Schools

Quotes2All of the choice-based reform efforts that they’ve come up with over the last 20 years have been designed to bring back all the white people who left after Brown v. Board. But the irony is that, if [districts] keep relying on choice, they’re going to be set up for failure because white people will not enroll their children in schools unless they’re already [predominantly] white.

-- Natalie Hopkinson, a black parent and journalist in The Atlantic (How Parents Can Help Desegregate Schools)

Books: How Repeated Evictions Impact Students' Lives

image from www.motherjones.com
Fans of high-quality nonfiction and those concerned about education and segregation should check out Matthew Desmond's pretty amazing book, Evicted, out earlier this year.

Focusing on the lives of poor white and black residents of one midsized city (Milwaukee), but making a national case, Desmond shows why poor people tend to move more often, but largely stay within confined geographic areas.

"There is an enormous amount of pain and poverty in this rich land,’ argues American sociologist Desmond in this brilliant book about housing and the lives of eight families in Milwaukee. (Via The Guardian)

The educational impacts of children whose families are moving frequently aren't the focus of the book, but they're ever-present: Lost sleep, changes of schools, going hungry, lack of heat or electricity, and constant worry. Families with children are much more likely to be evicted, notes this Mother Jones article.

The book also shows how academics and policymakers have missed much of what's going on by focusing on relatively small parts of the problem (federal housing vouchers and public housing) rather than larger ones (the private market) most poor renters inhabit.

Last but not least, Evicted shows that it's not just slumlords who are culpable for the deplorable, exploitative situation. The legal system, law enforcement, and even social support agencies all play a role in creating and perpetuating things -- and tolerating what's clearly intolerable. 

Morning Listen: Oakland Diversity? Not So Much When It Comes To Schools

KQED story describes impact of historic housing segregation, lack of district-provided transportation, and influx of white parents displaces kids of color in higher-performing schools (Oakland Prides Itself on Being Diverse — Until It Comes Time to Send Kids to School).

Or, listen to super-cute incoming kindergartners starting school in Chicago, via WBEZ. ("I can count in Spanish")

Quotes: How Charters Could Leverage Populist and Identity Momentum

Quotes2On the populist side, there is room to build bridges with those who distrust elitist authority... On the identity side... the charter community could do more to build bridges with race-based organizations that consist of, or serve, these families.

Neerav Kingsland (The Politics of Populism, Identity, and Charter Schools)

 

#EDgif Of The Day: Excited 4th Grader Already Thinking About What Comes Next

Charts: Poll Shows Majority Of Americans & Public School Parents Oppose Opting Out Of Standardize Tests

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"Fifty-five percent of public school parents oppose allowing children to sit out standardized tests. Overall, the demographic groups most opposed to the opt-out movement are black people (67 percent) and senior citizens (68 percent)." Results from #PDKPoll via Chalkbeat.

AM News: PDK Poll Results, Renewed Focus On Attendance, & More

Vast Majority of Americans Want Failing Schools Fixed, Not Closed, Poll Finds blogs.edweek.org/edweek/campaig…

Confusion Over Purpose of U.S. Education System | US News https://t.co/M3ygdtbpbc

Four charts reveal what Americans think about education | Chalkbeat ow.ly/kKvJ100iyNj #PDKPoll

Poll Finds Decreasing Public Support for Teacher-Tenure Laws#PDKpoll blogs.edweek.org/edweek/teacher…

Oakland schools nearly fully staffed after starting summer with teacher shortage edsource.org/2016/oakland-s…

Chicago's Emanuel Says Teachers Deserve Some Praise For Test Scores wbez.org/shows/wbez-new…

A New School Year Brings Renewed Focus On Attendance npr.org/sections/ed/20…

Schools struggle in outreach to parents of young children cabinetreport.com/human-resource…

After 20 Years, Are Charters And DCPS Learning To Get Along? | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio ow.ly/ilJ0303HgMp

Alaska to Teach How to Evade a School Shooter - TIME realcleareducation.com/2016/08/29/ala…

Military Families Turn to Homeschooling - KPCC realcleareducation.com/2016/08/26/mil…

Quotes: How The Recession Might Help Explain Low-Income Kids' Progress

Quotes2One likely explanation for the across-the-board increase in parents’ investing in their young children’s learning is that parents today are just far more aware of the unique importance of the early childhood years in shaping their children’s development... It also may be that the increase in parent-child interactions among low-income families has been driven, in part, by the shift of low-income children out of preschool programs and into parental care during the economic recession.

-- Daphna Bassok, a co-author of the study and professor at the University of Virginia (Despite Growing Income Inequality, Learning Gaps Between Rich And Poor Kids Are Actually Closing)

Update: Remembering Mike Brown, Two Years Later

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Two years after the death of Mike Brown is as good a time as any to point to remember a few important parts of the story of the Ferguson teen who was killed on this day in 2014.
 
We all probably remember that he he had graduated from high school three months early -- and that his graduation was not an unremarkable accomplishment.
 
It's less widely known that his mother, Lezley McSpadden, was among many teens who had been bused to school as part of a state desegregation program. According to a ProPublica story, she attended school in affluent Ladue.
 
But perhaps the most important thing to remember is how she responded in one interview, demonstrating frustration, despair, and anger that few of us will ever feel: 
 
 
Click the link to view the clip.
 
 
 
 
 

Morning Audio: Chicago Parents Debate School Integration Plan

Chicago Public Radio's Becky Vevea has a long piece about what happened when two principals and some parents come up with a plan to merge an overcrowded high-performing school (with relatively large numbers of white kids) with an under-enrolled lower-performing school (mostly serving kids of color).

It isn't pretty, but it's fascinating and important -- especially the voices and viewpoints of the parents who currently send their children to the two schools. 

Check out the story here

 

Quotes: Wealthier White Parents Want One Thing, Wealthier Black Parents Another

Quotes2I found middle class and affluent white families organizing to limit access, taking the good teachers, in the principal’s office daily advocating that ‘my kid gets the good programs.’ Wealthy Black families would rather pay their money and send kids to private schools.

- CUNY professor L'Heureux Lewis-McCoy in EWA via Education Post (We Can't Keep Ignoring the Suburbs and the Black People That Live in Them)

Magazine: Rethinking "Ghetto" Communities -- & Their Schools

This recent New Yorker article (There Goes the Neighborhood) raises a bunch of important questions about how we think about gentrification and low-income communities that used to be commonly called "ghettos" -- and, by extension, low-income (generally low-performing) schools.

Scholars have long been sympathetic towards these communities, according to the piece:

"Scholars who studied the ghetto tended to be motivated by sympathy for its residents, which often resulted in a complicated sort of sympathy for ghettos themselves."

It could be argued that some of the same emotions have been on display when it comes to the low-income, generally low-performing school.

However public opinion has changed dramatically.

"Where the ghetto once seemed a menace, threatening to swallow the city like an encroaching desert, now it often appears, in scholarly articles and the popular press, as an endangered habitat."

The reality may be, however, that displacements from gentrification are not be as widespread as is commonly thought. That's because underlying mobility rates are already relatively high in these communities, as evictions, better opportunities, and other shifts move families in and out of low-income areas.

In addition, "Gentrification needn’t be zero-sum, because gentrifying neighborhoods may become more densely populated, with new arrivals adding to, rather than supplanting, those currently resident. 

Sympathetic scholars, recent focus on gentrification, and questions about underlying mobility rates suggest that the common "gentrification = bad" construction that's prevalent right now might warrant some careful rethinking. Perhaps changes to neighborhood schools -- demographic, programmatic, etc. -- shouldn't necessarily be viewed with immediate suspicion. Perhaps gentrification isn't universally bad. 

Related posts:

Charts: Overconfident Parents

Here's the latest evidence that parents' beliefs about how well their schools are doing educating their children differ from NAEP performance evidence.

Quotes: The Impact Of Affluent Parents On Mixed-Income Schools

Quotes2Small groups of advantaged parents, many of them members of parent organizations... often push for programs that would benefit their own children and not necessarily the kids of less means. When these parents don’t get what they want, they often make calls to someone higher up than the principal, such as the superintendent, to flex their muscle—something lower-income parents rarely do.
 
- Allyson Criner Brown, the associate director at the nonprofit Teaching for Change, paraphrased in The Atlantic (The Tricky Politics of PTAs in Gentrifying Communities)

Afternoon Video: "White Boy Privilege" (From An Atlanta 8th Grader)

"In a video being widely circulated on Twitter on Monday morning, Royce Mann, an eighth grade student from Atlanta, is shown performing a slam poem titled “White Boy Privilege.” Across the social network, the video is being celebrated as the definition of responsible self-analysis by a white American at a time when racial tensions seem to be ever-increasing." via Fusion (Royce Mann’s white privilege poem goes viral)

Quotes: "It Took Me A While To See Past Race."

Quotes2Like many white people, my only experience of institutions was majority white. And so there was a learning curve for me. I was a little uncomfortable the first day of kindergarten. I saw black families – I didn’t see individuals. I saw Hispanic families … It took me a while to see past race, in a way, if that makes any sense, and to see that these were potential friends for me, these were potential allies, mom friends.

- Brooklyn parent and author Lucinda Rosenfeld, talking with WNYC's Rebecca Caroll and the NYT's Nikole Hannah-Jones at a recent panel on school segregation (What role should parents play in promoting integration?). Rosenfeld's next novel, about a white mom choosing a majority-minority school for her child, comes out early next year. 

People: St. Paul Magnet School Parents Mourn Philando Castile

This image from the memorial service for Philando Castile has been shared thousands of times in the past day or so.

Afternoon Video: Choosing A School When Race Is An Issue

Here's the video from last night's WNYC #raceinschools conversation including Lucinda Rosenfeld, Nikole Hannah-Jones, and Rebecca Carol. 

Books: Forthcoming Novel Highlights White Parents & Diverse Schools

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Lucinda Rosenfeld's new novel, Class, is scheduled to come out in a few months, but we're already starting to hear about it this summer.

According to the Amazon blurb, the book focuses on "idealistic forty-something Karen Kipple" who sends her kid to an integrated Brooklyn school.

"But when a troubled student from a nearby housing project begins bullying children in Ruby's class, the distant social and economic issues Karen has always claimed to care about so passionately feel uncomfortably close to home."

Sounds interesting -- if also perhaps stereotypical. But perhaps that's the point. Anyway, can't wait to read it. 

Meantime, Rosenfeld is on a panel tonight at 7 with Nikole Hannah-Jones and Rebecca Carroll.

Crossed fingers they'll talk about the UWS parents who are trying to block school integration, along with the Brooklyn situation.

You can watch the livestream here.

Morning Video: Hot Actor From Gray's Anatomy Wakes The Crowd At BET

In case you missed it Sunday night, here's an AJ+ video clip from Jesse Williams' impassioned speech honoring organizers, students, activists at the BET Awards show.

"We’re done watching and waiting while this invention called whiteness uses and abuses us, burying black people out of sight and out of mind, while extracting our culture, our dollars, our entertainment like oil."

Read the whole thing here.

Quotes: Parents Choose Diversity If They "Have To"

Quotes2Parents generally place greater value on schools with a high percentage of students of the same race/ethnicity as their child — but only if their child would otherwise be in the smallest minority at school. If their child won’t be in the smallest minority, parents are less concerned about — and, in fact, supportive of — schools with a more diverse student body.

- From Mathematic analysis of DC school lottery choices, via NY Times

Quotes: UWS Parents Tout Diversity & Defend Resistance To Integration At The Same Time

Quotes2There aren't a lot of African Americans who live on the Upper West Side...We were sad to learn that, you know? I would like more diversity, but we chose to move to this place because we put the quality of the education at a higher value.

-- An unnamed UWS parent in this Gothamist piece (UWS Parents Fight Proposal To Relocate School)

Quotes: Segregation & White Middle Class Voters

Quotes2School segregation is the result of intentional policy choices and governmental interventions. It was constructed, and to end it we must deconstruct it through further interventions. We also must acknowledge that segregation was created at the behest of middle class white voters and business leaders and it can only be undone at their behest.

- Nate Bowling (We have the answer, we choose to ignore it)

Quotes: "Stop Talking To The Press" About Their School, Advises Former "Daily Show" Correspondent

Quotes2So I urge you A, to stop talking to the press... This is a private matter, I think, from our community. This story doesn't exist without your quotes... Be mindful of when you speak, if you're going to speak to the press, because slandering or saying anything negative about this teaching staff is wrong... Conversely, painting any opposition as classist or racist is about as bad as it can get.

-- Jason Jones quoted on WNYC (Advice from Jason Jones to Upper West Side Parents: Don't Talk to the Press)



Charts: How Far Are Parents Willing To Go For Better Demographics, Scores?

School Choice in DC image

"For the [2014 Washington DC] lottery, families submitted rank-ordered lists of their preferred schools from a long list of options, including charter schools and traditional public schools."

From Mathematica (Market Signals: A Deep-Dive Analysis of Parental School Choice)

Afternoon Listen: Recent Philly HS Grad Was Youngest Orlando Victim

The youngest victim in Orlando, Akyra Monet Murray, had just graduated from high school in Philadelphia. NPR interviewed her family and friends about what happened to her that night. Warning -- explicit and heartbreaking.

Morning Video: "I Care About Diversity, But..."

"I Care About Diversity, But...": Moving from Talk to Action from NewSchools Venture Fund on Vimeo.

Here's an hourlong panel from this year's recent NSVF Summit addressing the gap between the idea of diversity and making it happen. The topic seems especially timely given this last weekend's NYT Sunday Magazine article about how individual parent decisions cumulatively reinforce residential segregation and school assignment policies.

Want more? There's another panel What Will it Take to Integrate Our Schools? that also looks good. 

 

 

Quotes: It Takes More Than Demographics To Integrate A School

 

Quotes2When you have people coming from all different neighborhoods to come to school together, they have no reason or way to get to know each other unless you sort of rip the top off the school and say the school is going to be the community.

- Community Roots Charter School Co-Founder Allison Keil in WNYC (How One Brooklyn Charter School Integrates With Intention)

Morning Video: When Middle-Class Parents Send Their Kids To Segregated Schools

This WNYC video short shows NYT writer Nikole Hannah-Jones and her husband taking their daughter to a segregated school in Brooklyn. Read the accompanying article by WNYC's Rebecca Carroll here, or the NYT piece about the decision and the controversy over rezoning the segregated school to give wealthier white kids access to the building.

#EDgif Of The Day: Projected School-Level Changes Under "Controlled Choice" In NYC

Here's a GIF showing how each school in NYC's District 1 would be affected by a controlled choice school integration initiative, based on a model presented by WNYC in its school integration series.

As you can see in the top row, schools that currently have almost 100 percent poor kids would see an influx of nonpoor kids. The bottom row shows how schools with relatively high percentages of nonpoor kids would gain poor classmates under a model plan.

The plan would phase in over time, and only new students (kindergartners, mostly) would be affected. But obviously these would be big changes for schools and families. Some families won't have choices. But we all know what happens when more affluent families don't get what they want. 

Morning Video: How Louisville HS Is Addressing Transgender Students

 

"Special correspondent Yasmeen Qureshi of Education Week has the story. It’s part of our weekly education series, Making the Grade."

Morning Video: Vermont's School Consolidation Pains

Consolidation isn't easy.

Quotes: Trump Would Overturn Gun-Free School Zones

Quotes2I’m going to get rid of the gun-free zones on the military bases. I’m also going to do it in schools. You say you have a school, and it’s gun-free. The criminals are out there saying, ‘This is incredible. This is perfect. There’s no guns in there. I’m the only one that’s going to have guns.’ You can’t do it. I’m going to work with the states, and if I have to, I’m going to try and perhaps override the states if I have to...

-- Donald Trump, quoted in the Washington Post (Clinton campaign’s claim that Trump would ‘force schools to allow guns in classrooms’)

Morning Video: Remembering Jazz Jennings

Hidden in the new LA Times story about a West LA transgender elementary school student is a 2007 ABC segment about Jazz, who was born as a boy. It seems like it's cut off at the end. Anyone know the update? 

Quotes: When Even School Advocates Can't Figure Out The System

Quotes2Here I was this advocate for education, and I couldn’t find a place for my son... I was crying in the principal’s office and I said, ‘I don’t know what to do.’ The principal said, ‘I don’t either.

Parent and advocate Arlyssa Heard in The Atlantic (The Bills That Want to Solve Detroit's School Crisis)

Quotes: Remediation's A Suburban Problem, Too

Quotes2More than a half-million poorly prepared students — or about one in four — were required to take remedial courses in math, English or writing. Forty-five percent of them came from middle-, upper-middle- and high-income families... At private, nonprofit four-year schools, for example, students whose families were in the top 20 percent of income nationally actually took more remedial courses than students in the bottom 20 percent at the same colleges.

-- NYT editorial page (aka Brent Staples) in Guess Who’s Taking Remedial Classes

Charts: Inter-District Racial Segregation Is The Real [Much Harder] Problem, Folks

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So much of the recent attention towards school segregation has focused on within-district segregation, which makes sense. Gentrification, attendance zone boundaries, immigration, and other factors all play a role there, and are relatively easily understood and at least theoretically addressed by a single school district or mayoral agency.  

But as USC's Ann Owens explained at last week's #EWA16 event, the most segregation takes place between different districts.

One reason this may garner less attention is that it makes it harder to consider what the solutions might be when two semi-autonomous public agencies are involved, and one of them is probably much better-off than the other. Consolidating districts? Good luck with that. Transfer agreements between districts? NCLB called for those but generated precious few actual transfers.

Interested in more about media coverage of segregation? Check out my column at The Grade about the surge in coverage, and some possible problems it raises.

Credit Ann Owens and sources listed.

 

Morning Video: Best-Off Districts Often Generate Biggest Achievement Gaps

"There's some deep ... problems that we as a society haven't faced up to yet.," says"Sean Reardon, a professor of poverty and inequality in education at Stanford University in this EdWeek video and article (Achievement Gaps and Racial Segregation: Research Finds an Insidious Cycle)

Quotes: NYC's Publicly Funded Preschool Expansion Looks A Lot Like A Voucher Program

Quotes2Observers and policymakers refer easily to New York’s pre-K program as part of the “public” education system or at the very least as a “public” education program. Yet vouchers for K-12 private schools are often criticized for “privatizing” public education.

-- James Ryan in Medium (The Largest Voucher Program You’ve Never Heard About)

Campaign 2016: Democrats Fighting Over [& With] #BlackLivesMatter

Deray mckesson

If all goes as expected, Black Lives Matter activist Deray McKesson (above right) will lose the Baltimore mayoral primary today.
 
But that shouldn't obscure what may be the biggest development of the first half of 2016, which is the uncertain, awkward interactions between the social justice movement BLM and the partisan political systems and players that shape everything from how billions in education funding gets spent to how Congressional districts are created.  
 
Even assuming McKesson loses, this Mother Jones article notes that BLM has backed winning candidates in other races.

There's no doubt that BLM has burst onto the scene like a much-anticipated Beyonce album. Just the other day, President Obama -- sounding somewhat out of tune given the detailed proposals of Project Zero -- criticized BLM for too much yelling and not enough engagement. 

Everybody wants to ally with BLM -- from Sanders and Clinton to teachers and school reformers -- at least most of the time.

But it isn't at all clear where the fit is going to last and (so far at least) BLM leaders haven't fractured or joined forces with any particular stakeholder group -- labor, education reform, the Democratic Party establishment, or Bernie Sanders liberals. 

McKesson, with his school reform background, has raised suspicions among some labor activists and progressives who might otherwise be eager to join with the social justice leader.

But for union and other leaders it's hard to figure out how to be with and against BLM leaders at the same time, or to come up with any coherent approach.

In recent weeks, there have been some fascinating, seemingly illustrative run-ins between BLM and existing advocacy groups like the Chicago Teachers Union.

In case you missed it, the CTU invited BLM to join a rally a few weeks ago, then struggled to figure out what to do when BLM's Page May started denouncing the police -- a union local -- from the event podium.

"The CTU keeps acting like they are on our side, but then Karen Lewis refuses to say cops need to get out of schools," May said in the DNA Info story. "Until they come out explicitly opposed to cops in schools, I don't think we are fighting on the same side."

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Read more about that in this excellent Laura Moser piece from Slate (Chicago Teachers Union is going through an awkward radicalization).

According to this American Prospect story, local BLM activists were part of the one-day CTU walkout.  And indeed they were there. But obviously CTU and the local BLM weren't really on the same page -- creating a conflict with the union that represents police officers.

When called on to apologize to the police for the rally comments, one CTU ally defiantly Tweeted "CTU can apologize once the [police union] apologizes for supporting & fundraising 100k for [police officer] Van Dyke who killed our CPS student."

A top CTU official distanced the union from the comments.

At roughly the same time, McKesson was indicating his support in the form of a raised fist emoji: 

How this is going to resolve is anybody's guess. BLM could implode or fade, like so many previous groups. It could splinter, or it could find an ally with one or several of the existing combatants out there.

The conundrum is just as much a challenge to education reform groups and Democratic Party traditionalists as it is to the CTU or progressives.

And of course much of the outcome will be shaped by BLM itself.

    TV: That *Awful* Charter School Finale From "Togetherness"

    I didn't hate finale of "Togetherness" as much as some folks -- or for the same reasons -- but the show certainly was a reminder that we should all be careful for what we wish for.

    With "Togetherness," I think I may have finally learned my lesson.

    For years, I've been hectoring my friends about the need for more and better depictions of schools in popular media, and celebrating the appearance of education wherever it might show up ("Parenthood," anyone?). 

    But Season Two of "Togetherness" got deeply into the issue as a major plotline, and it was disappointing to see how superficial and unrealistic the result turned out to be. 

    In Salon (The empty charter school dream), Sonia Saraiya traces the show from Season One to Season Two in ways that I find familiar. "For a show that can be so self-aware about marital dynamics and Hollywood culture, the charter school subplot is a glaring blind spot, one that is given more and more screentime as the season progresses."

    There were moments during Season Two that rang true: the uncomfortably fancy charter school fundraiser, the hilariously cliche'd curriculum (except it should have been a "forest" school , no?), the over-educated and clueless white parents thinking that creating and running a school is a lot easier than it is.

    But this recap (Everything Changes) makes clear how ridiculous things get by the end: "Michelle gets an idea to save the school: an educational theater show that is built by the kids. All they need to do is … tear everything down and rebuild it under the guidance of Sophie. Cut to the construction montage."

    Related posts: Oh, No! Girls' Lena Dunham Is Going To Be A TeacherThe origins of the LA schools storyline on 'Togetherness'New TV Series Features Immature Teachers.

    Quotes: School Funding Is A Race Issue As Well As A Money One

    Quotes2They live in this county, but they will not send their children to the schools in this county... We shop in the same place. We eat at the same restaurant. So why can’t our kids go to school together?

    -- Sumter County school board member Julene Delaine in School Funding In Alabama

    Morning Video: Prince Goes To School

    Skip to the 6:00' mark to watch Prince teach class to the tune of Starfish and Coffee. It's pretty fun.

    Or, go to this EdWeek story about an education project Prince's former wife started to help low-income kids in Minneapolis. h/t Kathleen Mazno. Anyone know what became of it?

    Quotes: Parents Need To Ask Tougher Questions To Combat Misperceptions

    Quotes2Build deeper relationships and ask tougher questions of your student's teachers...Instead of the teacher just saying, 'He's a great kid,' ask, 'Is he reading on grade level?' 

    -- Bibb Hibbard in NPR (9 Out Of 10 Parents Think Their Kids Are On Grade Level. They're Probably Wrong)

    Morning Video: King Takes On Desegregation

     

    Skip to the 32:00' mark to watch EdSec King talk at a recent Century Foundation event about encouraging districts to return to school desegregation. Seems like it might be too little too late to me, but it's certainly an interesting thing to have discussed.

    Or, watch Chicago teachers union head in a public TV segment on her fiery speech yesterday.

    Charts: Rise Of Special Ed Students

    EdWeek charts uptick in kids with IEPs after long-running declines.

    Charts: There Many Different Kinds Of Homeless Students In Schools

    More than 1 million kids lack a home of their own -- many doubled up with other families. Via Ben Spielberg & the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

    #edGIF Of The Day: "Why Is Being Educated Considered A 'White Thing'"?

    One of BuzzFeed's latest videos, purportedly about questions black people want to ask other black people, has generated reactions ranging from 😬 to 😡.

    One of the questions is a version of the age-old "acting white" issue, which Vox debunked not too long ago: The most insidious myth about black kids and achievement

    Seriously, some people are really offended by the attempted humor. For example: 27 Answers To Buzzfeed’s Dumb Video. This is probably where I should provide a trigger warning. 

    Related posts: Why Do Journalists Love Shaky Science on Race? Eduwonkette; How Barack Obama's Election Can Change the Myth of 'Acting White' NY Mag.

     

    Morning Video: Clinton Wouldn't Opt Her Granddaughter Out Of Testing

    Via Newsday: Hillary Clinton wouldn't opt out her granddaughter on Common Core tests http://nwsdy.li/1NlLr04 via

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    Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in This Week In Education are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.