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Magazines: 12 New Yorker Ed Articles Vox Missed/Got Wrong

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Vox's Libby Nelson has a good starter list of 12 New Yorker education articles to read while the archives are free but I think she might have missed and/or gotten a few wrong. 

No problem -- that's what I'm here for.

For example, the Vox list includes forgettable profiles of Arne Duncan and Diane Ravitch (Class WarriorPublic Defenderalong with Doug McGray's excellent Steve Barr profile (The Instigator).  

It recommends Kate Boo's story about the attempt to revamp Denver's Manual Arts (Expectations) but leaves out her amazing (2006 - I'm cheating) story about early childhood interventions (Swamp Nurse).

Steve Brill's The Rubber Room was an artful rehash of reporting done by others.  Rachel Aviv's Wrong Answer is a fascinating look at how some teachers decided they had to cheat that loses out in the end with its lazy reliance on NCLB as the main reason. 

Stories mysterious left out include the New Yorker's take on executive function (Delayed Gratification = 210 SAT Points) and Jill Lepore's fascinating revelation that liberal Icon Elizabeth Warren hates neighborhood-based school assignment (Your Favorite Liberal Lawmaker Supports Universal Vouchers*). Nick Lemann's 2010 turning point piece is left out, too (The overblown crisis in American education).

All that being said, kudos to Nelson for getting things started and including some ed-related stories like this summer's Jill Lepore takedown of "innovation" (The Disruption Machine), which I blogged about last month (The Innovation/Disruption "Myth"). Lots more examples from Gawande, Gladwell, etc. to be found. The Hit Man's Tale!?

Previous TWIE posts about the New Yorker:  Learning From The Gay Rights MovementLast Week's Problematic New Yorker Parent Opt-Out StoryThe New Yorker Takes Another Look At CoachingDelayed Gratification = 210 SAT PointsLessons From Earth Day 1970If Doctors Can Do It, So Can TeachersCoaching: Even Veterans & Star Teachers Could BenefitChecklists: The Simple Solution No One Wants To Try.

 

Hot Vs. Hot: Campbell Brown Vs. Matt Damon

Screen shot 2014-07-17 at 1.22.47 PM"Here's somebody whose influence on ed policy is in no way related to their hotness, unlike that bimbo Campbell Brown," quipped NY Mag journo Jonathan Chait, linking to Matt Damon's appearances at various anti-reform events a few years back.  

ICYMI, Ravitch questioned Brown's credibility on education issues about which the two people happen to disagree and in the process made several comments about Brown's looks.  

Damon has appeared at various anti-reform events in recent years, based in large part on his good looks and celebrity (and views on education with which Ravitch happens to agree).

Morning Video: Frontline's "Separate & Unequal"

 

This week's PBS Frontline focuses on school de-integration, and it well worth a watch.

Quotes: Neighborhood Schools "Part Of The Problem," Says Simmons

Quotes2The impulse to want a neighborhood school for your children is understandable... [But advocates for neighborhood schools] are part of the problem not part of the solution. -- Warren Simmons, executive director of The Annenberg Institute for School Reform (The Uncomfortable Reality of Community Schools). 

Quotes: Reform Debate Often Detached From Schools & Parents

Quotes2The policy debate has become so polarized that it often seems detached from the very people it is aimed at helping. - Joan Vennochi in The Boston Globe via Annenberg Institute

Afternoon Video: Military Mom Critiques Jindal's Common Core Reversal

In case you missed it during last week's shortened workweek. Click here if the video doesn't load properly.

Update: Diverse Charters Form New National Alliance

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Here's something I've been thinking might happen for a while now -- a new national network of diverse charter schools has been announced.

Included among the founding members are several of the schools I profiled in Education Next a couple of years ago (Brooklyn Prospect, Bricolage (NOLA), Community Roots, DSST (Denver), and yes, Success Academy.

See the full press release below, and tune into (attend) the panel on diverse charters at 4pm local time in Las Vegas.

Previous posts: Diverse Charters Spread Nationally (Education Next); Diverse NOLA Charter OpensDiverse Charters Balance Learning & Accountability; and Change Could Help Promote Charter Diversity.

Continue reading "Update: Diverse Charters Form New National Alliance" »

Video: Common Core Through 9-Year-Old Eyes

 

ICYMI: Here's the video that went along with last week's NYT story (Common Core, in 9-Year-Old Eyes).

Afternoon Audio: Google Search & Students' Academic Records

An adult job seeker whose Google search highlights his long-ago participation in a special education program is one of the examples cited in a new WNYC story about efforts to force Google and others to delete information from search results:

It's a variant on the student data privacy debate that's going on in education, which includes not only what data is collected but how it's safeguarded and what happens to it after a student's education is over.  

Google and others believe that transparency and avoiding censorship are reasons not to allow deletion requests.  European nations and privacy advocates believe that deletion requests are not nearly as problematic as has been suggested.

Morning Video: Pushy Pediatricians Stick Noses Into Early Reading

 

Here's last night's PBS NewsHour segment on the AAP's new recommendations for pediatricians to encourage parents to read to children and to give books to young parents. You may recall hearing about pediatricians handing books out during immunization visits.

AM News: Obama Moves To Tighten Special Education Scrutiny

News2A 'Major Shift' In Oversight Of Special Education NPR: Education Secretary Arne Duncan announces new measures for ensuring that students with disabilities are making progress.

Shift in Law on Disability and Students Shows Lapses NYT: The Education Department said that it would evaluate growth in students with disabilities over time and will compare their test scores with those of students not designated with special needs.

MPS lacks capacity to provide basics to special-ed students, external audit finds MinnPost: At its Tuesday night meeting, the Minneapolis board of education will get harsh news about an external audit that found the district lacks the capacity to effectively provide even basic programming to its special-education students.

States' special education services face tighter oversight by the Obama ... Washington Post: The Obama administration is tightening its oversight of the way states educate special-needs students, applying more- stringent criteria that drop the number of jurisdictions in compliance..

We're off to the reauthorization races Vox: The Senate proposal focuses on easing the burden of student loan debt, plus holding for-profits accountable. The House proposal adopts some of the recommendations that outside groups have urged to help students complete college, mostly the less controversial ones, and calls for rolling back most of the Obama administration's regulatory agenda on higher education.

House Republicans to Begin Work on Reauthorizing the Higher Education Act PK12: Republicans on the House Education and the Workforce Committee plan to introduce a series of bills this week as part of their efforts to reauthorize the Higher Education Act, a sweeping piece of federal legislation that includes the entire student loan system.

More news below (and throughout the day at @alexanderrusso).

Continue reading "AM News: Obama Moves To Tighten Special Education Scrutiny" »

Rebuttal: Don't Use Chicago As A Deseg Model

Ecastro flickr office of the principalIn response to yesterday's NYT oped from Rick Kahlenberg touting the Chicago model of income-based diversity enhancement, longtime Chicago special education advocate Rod Estvan wrote the following rebuttal suggesting that Chicago's results from the Kahlenberg plan haven't been all that good: 

"Unfortunately Dr. Kahlenberg does not discuss the fact that Payton’s admission system which is in part based on census tracts is being advantaged by the middle class and even wealthier families who live in enclaves within overall poorer community census tracts. In 2013, only 31.4% of Payton students were from low income families regardless of race whereas back in 2002 the school had about 37% low income students when there was no social economic admissions process but only a race based process."

See the full response below the fold.

Continue reading "Rebuttal: Don't Use Chicago As A Deseg Model" »

Maps: ProPublica Shows Most States Allow Adults To Pin Kids Down

ScreenHunter_05 Jun. 19 11.54From ProPublica's Heather Vogell: "Public schoolchildren across the country were physically restrained or isolated in rooms they couldn’t leave at least 267,000 times in the 2011-2012 school year, despite a near-consensus that such practices are dangerous and have no therapeutic benefit. Many states have little regulation or oversight of such practices." (Can Schools in Your State Pin Kids Down? Probably.., Violent and Legal: The Shocking Ways School Kids are Being Pinned Down, Isolated Against Their Will)

TV: Louis C.K. Takes Us Back To 8th Grade Science Class (Among Other Things)

image from cdn.hitfix.comFirst things first:  The last couple of episodes of Louie are full of flashbacks of Louie's classroom, lunchroom, and after-school experiences as an 8th grader, which include friends who pull him up and pull him back and a really sweet if somewhat misguided science teacher Mr. Hoffman who's just trying to reach the kids (and to get the administration to pay attention to the trouble kids are getting into after school).

It's memoir, at best, but it's pretty good -- and the parental reflections on how to deal with a temporarily-wayward child seem pretty powerful, too. For another good recap -- full of spoilers! -- go here.

In other Louis CK-related news, a recent interview in Medium with the comedian and father and Common Core critic gives us some helpful insight into CK's temprament through an anecdote about how he ended up not going to NYU film school:

"An old teacher of mine got me an interview at NYU film school, and I brought all these videos I’d made, and photographs, a portfolio — I’d gotten into photography and stuff, and they said that they would accept me to go to film school. So I quit my job with that in mind, and I’d been doing stand-up, but not well or successfully, and then I never filled in — I got these forms from this guy to fill in, on the floor of my apartment somewhere, but I couldn’t get my brain to…I was supposed to go back to my high school and get my transcripts, and the idea of doing all that, just that paperwork — going to NYU film school was this dream come true for me, but I couldn’t fill out the thing, couldn’t fill it out and go to the Xerox machine and put a stamp on an envelope, all that stuff. It made me want to vomit. That sort of thing has always been the case for me, I can’t get that done."

Something to keep in mind the next time you have the urge to present CK as the best example of a parent who might be able to help his daughters with homework, right?

Previous posts: Louis C.K. Isn't Really The Next Big Angry Common Core CriticMSNBC Focuses On Conservative Opposition To Common Core (includes CK joke re burning low-performing schools to the ground); Jerry Seinfeld Explains Gettysburg Address To Louis C.K.

Maps: Where The 74 School Shootings Since New Town Took Place

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"Blue markers represent incidents in 2014; red markers are for incidents from 2013. You may have to zoom in to view separate incidents in the same city. Cities that were home to multiple shootings are Atlanta; Grambling, La.; Savannah, Ga.; Jackson, Tenn.; Roswell, N.M.; Milwaukee; Augusta, Ga." (There have been at least 74 shootings at schools since Newtown) Click the link to zoom in and get more information.

Five Best Blogs: #Vergara Decision Triggers #CommonCoreDelay

The Vergara decision came down -- largely in favor of the student plaintiffs -- but then the Gates Foundation came out with a statement in support of a Common Core delay (in terms of high-stakes implications), seeming to catch everyone by surprise:

Did @gatesed @drvickip et al not realize that #Vergara was coming down today, or not care, or not believe that they could wait?

"A blanket delay is not appropriate for all states," says @CCSSO's @minnichc in response to @gatesed call for #commoncoredelay.

Still no word from @ArneDuncan on #commoncoredelay statement from @gatesed, pro or con, or what would be required to implement.

#Vergara judge: "“The evidence is compelling. Indeed, it shocks the conscience." via @StephanieSimon_ http://ht.ly/xQNWK 

College presidents express support for Common Core - Newsday http://ht.ly/xQJqY

How much Bill Gates’s disappointing small-schools effort really cost - @valeriestrauss http://ht.ly/xQlwu 

A Black Father's Search for a Diverse Preschool - Education Week http://ht.ly/xF2s5 

@AP: BREAKING: Police: Shooter used rifle in fatal attack at Oregon high school; teacher injured.

Morning Video: Homeless Valedictorian Thanks Mom For Inspiration

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Via NBC News.  

Quotes: Another Bad Thing NCLB "Caused:" The End Of "Reading Rainbow"

Quotes2Reading Rainbow was not cancelled because it was not effective. Reading Rainbow was the most used television resource in our nation’s classroom. In 2009, it was [cancelled] due to No Child Left Behind. - LeVar Burton (Criticism Of Reading Rainbow Is 'Bullsh*t')

Quotes: We Need More Power!

When we fail to right-size our reform efforts, we breed a sense of futility among teachers, parents and policymakers.  We might as well be shooting bottle rockets at the moon.  - Tom Kane (Overcoming the Legacy of Incremental Education Reform)

Morning Video: Liberal Parents Opt Out Of Vaccines, Create Surge In Disease


'The Daily Show' 060214 by lookatmyshirt

Quotes: Looking At The Common Core Glass As "40 States Full"

Quotes2I prefer to think of the glass as 35 to 40 states full rather than 3 to 4 empty.

- Gov. Wise Alliance for Excellent Education (@all4ed) via press release

Morning Video: Most Over-Confident Spelling Bee Elimination Ever?

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I see in this clip an allegory for overconfident reformers and/or overconfident reform critics, each of which group (a) looks a little bit too old for its grade, (b) tends to think they know the answer, (c) and fails to consider other options, and (d) rushes into action. Event roundup and who won via MSNBC here.

Quotes: Common Core By Any Other Name

Quotes2Even states that are publicly distancing themselves from the Common Core and its assessments are often patterning their new standards closely on it, rather than invest the time and money required to start from scratch.  -- NPR's Common Core FAQ

Maps: Just 9 States Provide Full Accountability Info, Says ECS

ScreenHunter_03 May. 29 11.09"Just nine states are using and reporting all five essential components of a strong accountability system identified by experts, according to a new report released by the Education Commission of the States. Those states are California, Kentucky, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Utah and Wisconsin." via Politico.

Many others are "difficult to locate and often lack meaningful information for parents."

 

Morning Video: Columbine Principal Reflects On Retirement

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

A little bit corny -- and not the first outlet to cover the story -- but Principal DeAngelis' last day (and what some of the students say to him on camera) is still worth watching.

Common Core: Remembering What *Current* Test Questions Look Like


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In discussing the merits of Common Core and their assessments, t's important (a) to be sure you're discussing a real Common Core field test item and (b) remember what the old/current test questions look like.  Above is an example from PARCC (What Do They Look Like?) that seems pretty basic for today's 4th graders.  What do you think?

Thompson: OK Rejects the "Test and Punish 3rd Graders" Fiasco

Henke-Katiex175Oklahoma’s Republican Legislature overrode the veto of Republican Governor Mary Fallin, and overwhelmingly rejected another cornerstone of Jeb Bush’s corporate reform agenda. The overall vote was 124 to 21.

As emphasized by the Tulsa World’s Legislature Overrides Fallin Veto on Reading Bill; Baressi Calls Decision a *Pathetic* Step Back, by Randy Krembiel and Barbara Hoberick, besieged Chief for Change Janet Baressi (who is still angry over Common Core defeats and pushback against Bush’s and her's A-F Report Card) condemned legislators as “pathetic.”

Oklahoma’s victory over the test and punish approach to 3rd grade reading is a win-win team effort of national importance. The override was due to an unexpected, grassroots uprising started by parents, joined by superintendents and teachers, organized on social media, and assisted by anti- corporate reform educators and our opposite, Stand for Children, as well as Tea Party supporters, and social service providers who are increasingly coming to the rescue of the state’s grossly underfunded schools.

Nearly 8,000 children, including nearly 30% of Oklahoma City and 1/3rd of Tulsan 3rd graders, failed their high-stakes tests. Now, they can be provided remediation as they are promoted to the 4th grade.

And, that is just the beginning of the good news. Retired librarian/reading expert Claudia Swisher finally gained traction in her effort to fact check reformers, and raise the consciousnesses of lawmakers about the dangers of the misuse of inappropriate tests.

Continue reading "Thompson: OK Rejects the "Test and Punish 3rd Graders" Fiasco" »

Quotes: "This Hole Was Not Dug Overnight"

Quotes2We've had terrible superintendents we allowed to stay on for several years. We've had poor management and nepotism. This hole was not dug overnight. -- Barbara Coscarello, a member of the district's advisory board (For Camden students, give charter schools a shot) via RP

Quotes: Initial Wins Are Nice, But Only The Beginning

Quotes2When advocates of a particular education policy are victorious in the legislative arena, they have only won a battle, not a war. Opponents will show up again and again during implementation—in schools, or before school boards, or in other local forums—to continue the battle. - Brookings' Tom Loveless via Robert Pondiscio

Media: Reporters Should Identify Union Employees, Says Anonymous Blog

NJ_18598An anonymous Montclair New Jersey blog  called "Montclair Schools Watch" noted earlier this week that Maia Davis, apparently one of the most prominent critics of the district and its implementation of the Common Core, has been quoted repeatedly in local media (like the Bergen Record) and started a group critical of reform efforts there without being identified as a UFT communications staffer.  

"It’s probably not a coincidence that one of their most aggressive spokespeople is really a professional spokesperson, employed by the massive teachers union across the river that has been one of the most aggressive in fighting reform efforts."

That's pretty much all I know.  Someone with the same name as Davis IDs herself as such on Twitter (@maia_davis). On Twitter, WSJ reporter Lisa Fleisher says that neither she nor her successor Leslie Brodie quoted Davis in their pieces but that Davis' views shouldn't necessarily be discounted if a reporter says where she works: "Hopefully people strongly believe in their work, so it doesn't hurt to acknowledge that in a story."

Should reporters ask (and pass along) what parent advocates do for their day jobs?  Should advocates identify themselves by where they work or what kind of work they do if it's relevant? My inclination is to say "yes."  The issue has come up in the past, for example in Chicago where parents and teachers were quoted without any indication of their affiliations. Reporters often reach out to the closest, most convenient, and most vocal stakeholders for quotes (rather than the most typical ones), and fail to ID them as such.

Of course, the blog making this point doesn't have any names attached to it, so the point is somewhat undercut. Whether it's "reformy astro turf" (as described by a critic on Twitter) or balanced and responsible, we don't know. And, the person who sent me the item comes from the reform side of the aisle, so there's that, too.

 

AM News: USDE Updates Civil Rights Rules For Charters (What About Discriminatory Attendance Zones?)

News2Civil Rights Laws Apply Equally to Charters, Says USDE PK12: The "Dear Colleague" letter by Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights Catherine E. Lhamon includes specific guidance for charter schools related to admissions, students with disabilities, English-language learners, and discipline.

In speech on school integration, King takes a dig at the city’s enrollment rules Chalkbeat: “There are places where you can look, including New York City, where blocks away students are separated by economic status,” King said. “Schools that serve mostly wealthy students blocks away from schools that serve mostly high-needs students, and we know that that segregation breeds inequality.”

De Blasio quietly adds hundreds of millions for charters  Capital NY: Tucked in a 291-page document related to the Fiscal Year 2015 budget he unveiled on May 8 are two increases to charter schools: $26.9 million for the current fiscal year, which ends June 30, and an extra $219.7 million for next year. Those figures reflect spikes from the preliminary fiscal plan he unveiled in February. That brings the total amount his administration plans to spend on charters in FY2015 to nearly $1.3 billion, up from $1.06 billion this year.

Instead of getting ready for the tech revolution, schools are scaling back Hechinger: For schools that haven’t yet made technology an integral part of every student’s school day and every teacher’s lesson planning, the problem is often basic: Their Internet connection is too weakand their laptops (if they even have them) are too old to handle whole classrooms of students spending most or even part of their day online.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan talks teaching before giving ASU ... Phoenix Business Journal: Before giving the commencement speech for more than 10,000 graduates at Arizona State University in Tempe tonight, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan met with a dozen Phoenix-area principals to talk about how teachers can play a more central role

Are student files private? It depends. Politico: The laws may sound iron-clad, but there are huge loopholes. See also: Data mining your children Politico: Private-sector data mining is galloping forward - perhaps nowhere faster than in education.

More news below (and throughout the day at @alexanderrusso).

Continue reading "AM News: USDE Updates Civil Rights Rules For Charters (What About Discriminatory Attendance Zones?)" »

Maps: Advantaged Kids Not Doing So Well In Most States, Either

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We're not supposed to trust data just because it's presented in soothing map form, but according to EdNext "U.S. schools seem to do as badly teaching those from better-educated families as they do teaching those from less well educated families. " U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests. Click for the interactive version (and be sure to moust over to the arrow for better-educated families).

Quotes: Not Just One Achievement Gap In The U.S.

Quotes2The United States has two achievement gaps to be bridged—the one between the advantaged and the disadvantaged and the one between itself and its peers abroad. Neither goal need be sacrificed to attain the other. - Hanushek and Peterson in EdNext (U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests)

Research: New App Tries To Evaluate Impact Of Ed-Themed Movies

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Advocacy campaigns can be extremely powerful -- but even the best-designed efforts can also be sadly ineffective, or at least appear to be so.  Measuring their impact is hair-pullingly difficult.

That's why one of the most interesting outfits I learned when re-examing the impact of the 2010 film Waiting For Superman -- in-depth report coming soon from AEI! -- is the NYC-based Harmony Institute.  

The outfit did a preliminary investigation of the impact of WFS that was funded by the Ford Foundation (but never released in full), and is now demo-ing a product called ImpactSpace, which is a web application for "visualizing the social impact of documentary films." The app now includes 250 films across 24 social issues (including education). Check it out -- and let us know what you think.

Previous posts: A Misleading Approach to Assessing Advocacy [Reckhow]; More Ways To Measure AdvocacyAdvocacy Costs Lots, But What About Its Impact?Impact Of Advocacy Funding On Services.

Morning Video: Parent Arrest Video Gets 750,000 Views

I'm not sure what's particularly newsworthy about this but New Hampshire parent William Baer was arrested for going past his allotted 2 minutes in complaining about a book that'd been assigned to his daughter. Via Viral Videos. Read more on CBSFox, and HuffPost

Update: Pushback Against Excessive Student Data Restrictions In GA

Giulia Forsythe FlickrThere's no shortage of concern and controversy surrouding student data privacy these days, resulting in scads of hearings and legislative proposals.

Check out Anya Kamentez's helpful explainer (in which she also describes having helped unearth private student data in a high-profile student privacy situation when she was a college student).

No doubt, at least some of these concerns are warrented.But in other cases, the proposals may go overboard.   

In Georgia, educators and others got together to prevent a proposed piece of legislation from going forward. You can read about it on the AJC blog: "Parents, college presidents, technology giants, superintendents, chambers of commerce and teachers joined forces to call out the insanity of dumping national standards, forbidding tests that reflected national standards and imposing technology limits so extreme that they'd shut down online learning." The state PTA education chair was among them. In response, the Governor reversed himself on the proposal and it was halted.

For more background, check out some local public radio segments here, here, here, and critical commentary here. Share more about what you know or think in comments or on Twitter. Image via Flickr: Giulia Forsythe.

Quotes: Parents Don't Care About Your Stupid Common Core Distinctions

Quotes2Supporters cannot claim credit for the adoption of clearer and more rigorous standards and then wash our hands of anything bad that happens in the name of implementation. -- Kathleen Porter-Magee (Seeing Common Core from a parent’s perspective)

Celebrities: Louis C.K. Isn't Really The Next Big Angry Common Core Critic

image from www.thefashionisto.comComedian Louis C.K. has been all over the place this past few days, thanks to a series of Tweets in which he expressed his parental frustrations with homework, testing, and the Common Core -- gobbled up by Common Core critics and celebrity-starved education writers alike.

The rant was over pretty quickly and ended with "Okay I'm done. This is just one dumb, fat parent's POV. I'm pissed because I love NYC public schools. mice, lice and all." 

Note that he didn't claim any more knowledge than his immediate experience.  Note that he's not idealizing pre-Common Core public schools. And he didn't advocate and end to testing or opting out, either.

Of course, when you have 3 million followers and a national TV show you don't get to be "just a parent" for very long, and not everyone admired C.K.'s rant.  

His response to the criticisms directed at him -- and to the anger directed as his detractors -- plus some anecdotes taken from his new GQ profile all suggest to me that C.K. probably isn't going to end up a Common Core hater or opt-out proselytizer.

Read on for some of the reasons why. Or just go about your business believing what you've been told.

Continue reading "Celebrities: Louis C.K. Isn't Really The Next Big Angry Common Core Critic" »

Quotes: Camus Thanked Elementary Teacher After Winning Nobel Prize

Quotes2Without you, without the affectionate hand you extended to the small poor child that I was, without your teaching and example, none of all this would have happened. -- Open Culture (Albert Camus Sends a Letter of Gratitude to His Elementary School Teacher 1957)

Media: What The New Yorker's Parent/Reporter Should Write About Next

 Yau Hoong Tang FlickrThe New Yorker's Rebecca Mead weighed in on the Common Core standardized testing debate with a blog post claiming that poor parents were also opposed to the testing and wanted to opt out while at the same time lamenting the fact that so many New York City parents send their kids to private schools.  If there were more wealthy parents in the public system, there would be more protest, according to Mead. 

I'm not sure those two arguments really go together, and I'm not sure it's particularly useful to have the New Yorker assign a writer who's a parent at a school deeply involved in opting out be the one to communicate to the larger world about the complicated issue of testing and accountability.  

Or at least ask her to write about more challenging topics like Elizabeth Warren's denunciation of housing-based school assignments that benefit the relatively well-off. (Ditto Ravitch, ditto Strauss, ditto Simon.)

But that's not really the point of this post.   

Continue reading "Media: What The New Yorker's Parent/Reporter Should Write About Next" »

Morning Video: Elite Schools Lose Racial Diversity Under Socio-Economic Plan

Elite high schools in Chicago have become substantially less diverse under a family income-based plan designed in part by Richard Kahlenberg to replace the district's longstanding deseg consent decree five years ago. Watch the local public television segment above, or read the Chicago Sun Times story here.

Trailers: Linklater's "Boyhood" Charts One Boy's Life Ages 6-18

This new Richard Linklater film follows one boy through 12 years of growing up -- most of it in school -- and was filmed over the same period of time. Watch the trailer then read more about it here: Chronology, Memory & A Movie That Occurs Offscreen. via Kottke.

 

 

Quotes: When the Circus Descends

Quotes2Common Core resistance "has less to do with substance and more to do with talk-radio bombast and interest group resistance to change." - David Brooks' NYT column last week (When the Circus Descends)

Bruno: Who Told Us The Education Fights Poverty, Anyway?

Screen shot 2014-04-21 at 2.51.06 PMWhen charged with "ignoring poverty", many education reformers will respond that in fact improving education is the best way to fight poverty. 

Arne Duncan once went so far as to say that "the only way to end poverty is through education."

Is that correct?

I'm skeptical. As Matt Bruenig has pointed out, educational outcomes have been improving for decades in the United States, and yet poverty rates haven't really budged.

And what about internationally? Certainly, many developed countries have much lower poverty rates than the United States. Is that a result of superior educational performance?

One preliminary way to look at the evidence would be to see if countries with better academic performance also have lower poverty rates.

Out of curiosity I decided to take a first crack at that using results from the 2012 PISA, which tested 15-year-olds in reading, math, and science.

Click below to see what I found. 

Continue reading "Bruno: Who Told Us The Education Fights Poverty, Anyway?" »

Quotes: Pay No Attention To The "Velvet Ropes" Surrounding Neighborhood Schools

Quotes2Between formally selective admissions policies and economically restrictive enrollment zones, many schools are effectively off-limits, particularly to our low-income families — surrounded, as it were, by invisible velvet ropes. -- NYC charter schools advocate James Merriman (in the NYDN), following up as it were on Elizabeth Warren's very similar point regarding neighborhood schools.

Media: Bullying, A Federal Civil Rights Complaint, & A Wealthy District's Response

ScreenHunter_03 Apr. 17 23.08You might have missed this series of stories from Palo Alto Weekly about student bullying, a district's flawed response -- I certainly did -- but the Society of Professional Journalists gave the Northern California outlet one of its top awards for small media outlets.

Read more about the stories given the award here, or how the stories came about here. Interesting to note that the reporters unearthed a federal Office of Civil Rights case about halfway through the process, and in the end the complaint was made public (by the child's parents).

"The Weekly coverage included two cover story packages researched and written by Lobdell,"Out of the Shadows," (June 14, 2013) about bullying, and "Power to Hurt," (Aug. 16, 2013) on the use of social media by teens, and numerous news stories by Kenrick and Lobdell on the school district's handling of bullying complaints, federal investigations and the development of bullying policies."

The full list of SJP awardees is here -- I didn't see any other education-related stories but I might have missed some.

Maps: School Fundraising Vs. Federal Poverty Funding In San Diego

image from voiceofsandiego.org"Foundation money and Title I money balance each other out.  The schools in the middle... are being left behind." (Voice of San Diego: School Foundations vs. Title I Funds)

Morning Video: They've Re-Segregated In Tuscaloosa

"The district, once the model of racial integration, has moved back in time, such that "nearly one in three black students attend a school that looks as if Brown v. Board of Education never happened." (Plus a long feature story in The Atlantic Magazine with ProPublica)

Quotes: Duncan Responds To Criticism Of Data Privacy Guidance

Quotes2We created a new Chief Privacy Officer. We've put out guidance recently, and where it needs to be strengthened going forward -- and not just us, but everybody, states, districts, schools, myself as a parent trying to figure it out everyday with my kids. This is not one that you're going to issue some guidance and that's the Bill of Rights for the next 100 years. -- Arne Duncan (Arne Duncan Responds to Criticism Over Student Data Privacy EdWeek)

Politics: Your Favorite Liberal Lawmaker Supports Universal Vouchers*

image from www.newyorker.comMaybe you knew this already but liberal darling US Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) supports private school vouchers -- for everyone.*

US News had the story in 2012 (Elizabeth Warren's Quiet Support for Public School Vouchers), and it comes up again in the latest New Yorker as part of a review of her new book (Reading Elizabeth Warren).

Warren doesn't just support vouchers in special circumstances, like special education placements or DCPS.  She wants to give them to everyone, everwhere.  

As quoted in the New Yorker piece, Warren has written that 

“An all-voucher system would be a shock to the educational system, but the shakeout might be just what the system needs.”

According to Warren, those "public" schools in expensive enclaves aren't really all that public as their defenders like to make them sound: 

"Schools in middle-class neighborhoods may be labeled 'public,' but parents have paid for tuition by purchasing a $175,000 home within a carefully selected school district."

Interestingly, Warren's argument is at least partly based on the high housing costs associated with the current zip code-based system of allocating scarce quality schooling.  High housing costs, plus burdens on working Americans (mothers in particular) have been a scourge for decades, according to Warren.  Breaking the link between housing and school quality would relieve pressure on families that have moved to expensive places just for the schools.  

Warren's ideas have been debated on Diane Ravitch's site in recent days --  they're New Yorker readers too, it seems :-) -- though not surprisingly the idea is being met with shock and disappointment. And the New Yorker writer, Jill Lepore, calls Warren's proposal reckless.

Previous posts: Please Stop Talking About Banning Private SchoolThe Liberal Case Against Private Education; Failure, Voice, & ExitHow Vouchers Are Like Same-Sex Marriage

*Correctification: Though she uses the term "voucher," which is commonly used to denote programs that include private and parochial schools, Warren is primarily focused on eliminating the link between neighborhoods and public school assignment.  The 2012 US News article cited above calls Warren's proposal "public school vouchers." The original 2007 proposal excerpted by AFT Kombiz uses the same language (though it doesn't specificaly exclude private schools as I read it). "The public-versus-private competition misses the central point," writes Warren. "The problem is not vouchers; the problem is parental choice."

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in This Week In Education are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.