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Morning Video: Oklahoma Backpedals On Common Core

 

Via the PBS NewsHour's Friday show: "Last month, Indiana became the first state to drop the Common Core standards it had already adopted... This month, Oklahoma became the latest state to take a big step toward repealing the Common Core education standards."

Morning Video: First Lady's Alma Mater Featured In New Documentary

 

This trailer describes both the history of the school itself and the stunning inadequacy of supply of seats given the talent and the demand.  Via CPS Obsessed.

Afternoon Video: Stephen Colbert Attacks Then Endorses Common Core

At first, Colbert is outraged at the idea of common standards and anything being promoted by the Obama administration, but then he begins to change his mind. TeachingNow Via @benjaminriley.

Morning Video: White House Pushes Tech Solutions

 

Here's a clip from Politico's edtech event yesterday, featuring Kumar Garg from the OSTP. Full video here. Story link here.

 

Morning Video: Obama Announces Grants For Real-World School Experiences

 

From the NYT. Story here.

Maps: Indiana Stands Alone (For Common Core Reversal)

Screen shot 2014-04-03 at 9.55.49 AMThe black-colored state is Indiana, which just formally withdrew from Common Core (though it's developing standards and assessments that will mirror them). Via EdWeek . Click below for the full version of the map and explanations.

Continue reading "Maps: Indiana Stands Alone (For Common Core Reversal)" »

Morning Video: "Big Patterns Of Disparity By Race"

Here's PBS NewsHour's coverage of the big Office of Civil Rights report (first in 15 years, apparently) that came out on Friday, plus an online explainer. The segment features USDE's Catherine Lhamon and doesn't mention differences in patterns by type of school.

Afternoon Video: Watch Obama Avoid Saying "Common Core" 10 Times

image from i1.huffpost.com
It's not quite a SuperCut, but HuffPost's Rebecca Klein has assembled a bunch of Obama speeches in which he talks about high standards but avoids saying "Common Core."

Morning Video: Duncan Talks Common Core At White House

 

On Friday, they let Duncan talk to the White House press corps and he ended up answering questions about the Common Core. via The Blaze. #someonepleasgifthis

Update: Parents Can't Opt Children Out Of Tests (In Illinois, At Least)

Dear-parentsParents are considered something close to the ultimate authority in most school situations, and can opt their children out of all sorts of things including sex ed, recess, and immunizations.  They can take their kids out of school (within limits). 

It hasn't always been the case, but in many states, they can now opt their children out of public education entirely, and homeschool.

But apparently the parental prerogative is not universal when it comes to standardized testing in Illinois, where the latest wrinkle in the opt out efforts of a relative handful of Chicago parents is the determination that they can't just sign a note or fill out a form.  

Read on for more details -- and some questions.

Continue reading "Update: Parents Can't Opt Children Out Of Tests (In Illinois, At Least)" »

Morning Video: High Intensity Tutoring (Plus Mentoring) Shows Impact

Tutoring plus mentoring (in Chicago the program is called Becoming A Man) can have profound results, according to recent research.  Via Chicago Public Television.

Afternoon Audio: Community Organizing & School Reform

I figure since I missed this 2011 WNYC segment featuring Mark ("Match On Dry Grass") Warren and Desiree Pilgrim Hunter (BCCC), maybe you did, too. I found it and lots of other videotape, etc. from the 2012 conference. Were you there? Did you already know about all these efforts? Have they been successful and effective, locally and/or nationally, since then?

AM News: Will Oregon Be Able To Keep Its NCLB Waiver?

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Washington Gov. Jay Inslee seeks to keep waiver from No Child Left Behind law The Oregonian: Jay Inslee says he had a productive meeting with U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan on Sunday to discuss options to preserve the state's waiver from provisions of the federal No Child Left Behind law. 

When Grownups Take the SAT The New Yorker: Since Kaplan set up shop, test-prep tutoring has come out of the basement. It’s now a billion-dollar industry whose primary product is heartache: college admission is, after all, a zero-sum game.

As High Schoolers Wait For College Notices, D.C. Fights To Get Students To Apply WAMU: Thousands of high school seniors across our region are waiting to hear if they've gotten into the colleges of their choice, but in the District, D.C. public schools are making a big push to get students — especially those from low-income backgrounds — ready for higher education.

Charters' desire for closed schools will be a difficult sell for CPS and city Chicago Tribune: The growing charter movement is one logical use for the 43 recently vacated CPS school buildings, but the district promised during the painful process of closing schools last year that it would not allow privately run charters into the buildings. CPS said it had nothing to do with Legacy's proposal.

After years of talk, MPS takes decisive action on the achievement gap MinnPost: When the announcement was made at the Minneapolis School Board’s February meeting that an office was being created to focus specifically on the welfare of black boys there was polite applause and a palpable wave of Minnesota Nice discomfort. 

Public schools recruiting international high schoolers USA Today: Newcomb is one of a number of school districts -- both public and private -- quietly taking advantage of a growing interest in an American education by cash-ready international students. Federal statistics show that the number of international high schoolers arriving in the USA on F-1 visas has jumped from about 6,500 in 2007 to 65,000 in 2012. 

More news below (and throughout the day via @alexanderrusso).

Continue reading "AM News: Will Oregon Be Able To Keep Its NCLB Waiver?" »

Afternoon Video: President Won't Give Up Student's iPad

Taken at Buck Lodge Middle School in Adelphi, Maryland on February 4, 2014

#EdGif Of The Day: Duncan Shines In NBA Celebrity All-Star Game

GIF via SBNation Via

Update: National Audit Of Testing Proposed By Senate

Screenshot.16Curious about just how much testing is going on in schools, and frustrated with the anecdotal reports and hyperbolic accounts?  

So was the Senate HELP Commmittee, way back in 2011-2012.

That's right. There was language in the bipartisan Harkin ESEA bill calling for the creation of a national commission that would have, among other things, been charged with "determining the frequency, length, and scheduling of such tests and assessments, and measuring, in hours and days, the student and teacher time spent on testing."

The Senate language was proposed by Senators Alexander and Bennet.  

Indeed, Bennet introduced standalone legislation last year. Colorado has been working on auditing and coordinating tests for several years, according to this 2011 Durango Herald opinion piece. Alexander is listed as a co-sponsor.

Since then, the noise surrounding test proliferation and/or test uses has risen exponentially -- warranted or not, we don't really know.  Chicago and DC have already initiated testing audit/streamlining procedures. 

The TeachPlus report that came out the other day indicated that there were large variations around the country, and that official and classroom views of the testing burden are very different.  However, the report was limited to a small set of districts. [See here for some updated information on why its Chicago numbers were initially wrong.]

I proposed something along the same lines in my latest Scholastic Administrator column: "Secretary Duncan has at least one thing he could do with his remaining time in office that could be both effective at preserving his initiatives and popular with educators and parents. He could begin to address concerns over test proliferation...  Serving as a watchdog against overtesting, he would also effectively be protecting the Common Core assessments during a very vulnerable time."

Hardcore testing opponents would not be appeased, of course -- look no further than the reactions to the New York State attempts to compromise on Common Core implementation for evidence of that. But, depending on the results such an audit provided, everyone else might be reassured and glad to know how different states and districts compare.

No word back yet about whether the USDE had taken a position on the language or not -- or what they think of the idea now.   

Maps: 17 States Forced To Adopt Common Core But Rejected ObamaCare

image from blogs.edweek.org

Much has been made of the fact that states were "forced" to adopt Common Core for financial and other reasons, but if that was the case then why would 17 of them have adopted Common Core but not the Medicaid expansion offered under the Affordable Care Act? EdWeek's Andrew Ujifusa delves into the apparent paradox.

Unsolicited Suggestions: A National Testing Audit*

TestauditduncanscholasticMy new column for Scholastic Administrator proposes that the Obama administration undertake an audit and establish some testing guidelines for states and district to work with -- not a mandate, just some parameters.

Why bother?  Earlier this year, I noted that for all the hullabaloo surrounding overtesting we didn't really know all that much about test proliferation beyond anecdotal reports and isolated (and sometimes hyperbolic) media accounts. There is no national data that I've found. FairTest doesn't track this information comprehensively.  

Some parents and teachers seemed to feel like there was way more testing than in the past.  Some were just objecting to new, harder tests or to  new, controversial uses of the test results (to rate teachers not just schools or kids).

Last week, Teach Plus took a stab at answering some of the questions about test proliferation and variations among districts and states.  Even with findings revised to reflect changes in Chicago, there were clearly large differences among districts in terms of how much testing and time were involved -- and large differences between official time for administration and teachers' accounts even before test prep time was included.

Of course, the USDE has its hands full with test-related issues over which it has more direct control than whatever add-ons states and districts have layered onto federal requirements. The Secretary has given out 5 "double-test" waivers (CT, MS, MT, SD, VT) and has another 10 under review (CA, IA, IL, IA, KS, MD, MA, NV, OR, WA). Three states (ID, MT, and SD) are going to use their new field test assessments.  Connecticut is going to use the field test assessments for 90 percent of districts.  California is going to use them for elementary school accountability. 

But I still think that it'd be a good idea for someone to take a national snapshot of where we are on the testing burden front.  Right now, the whole discussion is happening in the absence of consistent and reliable data. Image via @scholasticadms *Fixed link - thanks, KL

Morning Video: DC Mayor Touts Early Childhood (With Duncan Assist)

 

DC's City Paper notes that EdSec Duncan makes a cameo appearance  -- in Mayor Vincent Gray's latest education video, and that his predecessor worked hard to get an endorsement from Duncan (but never apparently got one).

Quotes: Obama Bashes Art History Majors

Quotes2You can make a really good living and have a great career without getting a four-year college education... as long as you get the skills and training that you need. - President Obama last week (via Medialite)

Photos: Three Things To Do With This USDE SOTU Pic

Unnamed (3)Three things you can do to show off using this @EDPressSec photo taken during the SOTU last night:  

(1) Correctly ID at least three of the faceless bureaucrats who are depicted.

(2) Correctly ID exactly when during the speech the image was taken.

(3) Come up with a better caption than these two:

"See, we told you he was going to talk about schools"

"Hey, no pictures. My spouse thinks I'm out playing poker."

Update: Private Vs. Public, Ugly Gentrification, & Weighted Lotteries

image from gothamist.comPicking schools is one of the most intense debates in education. So it's no surprise that there are 350 comments and counting on this January 17 Gothamist blog post in which a NYC newcomer asks a NYC veteran (pictured, as a youth) whether to send their kids to the public school in a gentrifying neighborhood or do the private school thing?

What makes the post extra interesting is that the local public elementary under consideration -- PS 9 -- recently lost its Title I funding and is now hard to get into from out of zone and is precariously close to flipping (like Petrilli et el described in a recent Washington Post oped).They proposed various measures to help schools encourage and support diversity rather than flip entirely (that whole ugly gentrification thing).

Some good news is on the horizon, though.  Just this morning, the USDE put out some new charter school guidance that allows them to use a weighted lottery to prevent flipping, which they were formerly prohibited from doing if they wanted to get the $500K charter school startup money.  There are a handful of diverse charters in Brooklyn near PS 9, and a few more opening.  I wrote about diverse charters like DSST, Community Roots, and Brooklyn Prospect in Educatoion Next not too long ago.

Update: USDE Doesn't Subscribe To POLITICO After All

Fist-of-Money-1Late last night I came across a CJR article noting that Politico's much-discussed Pro subscription model was likely to work because there were enough folks in DC with the need and the budget to buy it -- with a specific mention of the USDE's Office of Communications.

Indeed, there was a link to an official-looking RFP from December in which the USDE does indicate an interest in getting in on the Politico coverage. Nobody else can provide the "timely breaking news & in-depth, targeted coverage POLITICO Pro provides," according to the RFP.

However, the USDE is not after all a Politico subscriber, says the USDE's Massie Ritsch: 

“Politico has assembled a team of talented reporters and editors who have quickly contributed news and insight to the ongoing dialogue about education. The Department explored subscribing to Politico Pro but we were unable to negotiate a reasonable price to justify signing up.”

One issue that may have come up is that it's not clear if you can subscribe just to one vertical (education, health, etc.) or whether you have to get them all.  CJR says that it's $8,000 for five users, but that  might not be accurate.  CJR also notes that at higher price points Politico doesn't actually need that many buyers.

Anyway, we're still looking for someone willing to tell us that they subscribe to the Pro version of the site.  Come on, it's OK to brag.  Screenshot or it didn't happen.  Image via wow that's an old clip art.

SOTU 2013: Four Great Education Ideas Obama Won't Mention Tonight

image from www.wired.comSo far, at least, I've come up with a measly handful of things that President Obama could propose and implement without Congressional approval -- neither of which is likely to get mentioned tonight or done anytime soon.  

But they're good ideas -- take a look, White House speechwriters! -- and others have lots of ideas. They're not going to happen, either -- and hey, it's possible that something could come out of tonight's speech.  Unlikely, but possible. 

Herewith, 4 Russo recommendations (none of them really my ideas) for actions Obama could take on the education front in his speech tonight, related to high-intensity tutoring, charter school diversity, an audit of testing, and a renewed call for equitable teacher distribution (Vergara!).

Image: The Dialectic, via Wired

Continue reading "SOTU 2013: Four Great Education Ideas Obama Won't Mention Tonight" »

Update: Duncan-Starr "Liar" Beef Heats Up

Via Valerie Strauss, who notes that Duncan weighed in against Starr for NYC but doesn't mention that (a) she wrote the story (and some considered it to be journalistically problematic) and (b) that Duncan also used to tout test score increases when he was a superindent in Chicago so he's calling himself out as well as everyone else. 

Video: "Take Dead Aim On The Rich Boys" (Rushmore)

 

In anticipation of tomorrow night's class-based State Of The Union speech, enjoy this scene from 1998's prep school classic, Rushmore. "They can buy anything, but they can't buy backbone." via Gothamist

AM News: High-Scoring Success For All Not Cool Enough For USDE

News2Success for All Again Scores Big, And Loses, in i3 Contest Politics K12: For two years in a row, Baltimore-based school turnaround organization Success for All has earned the top score in the scale-up category of the federal Investing in Innovation contest, only to be passed over, U.S. Department of Education records confirm.

New York Wants To Give Special Education Kids Easier Tests Like 'The Old South,' Advocate Says Huffington Post: Should students with disabilities be held to the same academic standards and tests as other kids their age? That decades-old question is being revived by a debate in New York. Some advocates charge that a proposed tweak to the state's No Child Left Behind update may shortchange vulnerable students -- and, if approved, could spread to other states. 

De Blasio, a Critic of Charter Schools, May Need Them for His Pre-K Agenda NYT: Mayor de Blasio is looking for classroom space and qualified teachers to accommodate 50,000 prekindergartners. Charter schools are willing, but not allowed to provide prekindergarten.

Arizona Hopes New Charter Schools Can Lift Poor Phoenix Area NYT: A movement in Phoenix to open 25 high-performing schools in the next five years is focused on test scores in the growing Latino population

Most D.C. residents give public schools low ratings in poll Washington Post: The share of District residents who think that the city’s public schools are performing well has more than doubled since the mid-1990s, but most continue to give low ratings to the schools.

Teachers union set to demand salary hike of 17.6 percent LA School Report: The UTLA House of Representatives last night voted to demand a significant salary hike for teachers — an increase of nearly 20 percent.

In Age of School Shootings, Lockdown Drills Are the New Duck-and-Cover NYT: At the whiff of a threat, a generation growing up in the shadow of Columbine and Sandy Hook is trained to snap off the lights, lock the doors and take refuge in corners and closets.

More news below and from overnight on Twitter (@alexanderrusso)

Continue reading "AM News: High-Scoring Success For All Not Cool Enough For USDE" »

Afternoon Video: Rev. Wright Slams Obama At Teachers Union Event

As you may have read (Politico had it first that I saw) earlier this week, Chicago Teachers Union invited firebrand Reverend Jeremiah Wright to speak at an MLK-related breakfast Wednesday morning, and from what I've seen since then Wright didn't disappoint. Watch video above (via HuffPost) or click below for other news coverage.

Continue reading "Afternoon Video: Rev. Wright Slams Obama At Teachers Union Event" »

Thompson: Countdown to Universal NCLB Proficiency

NclbAs we begin another spring testing season, educators will further highlight the educational malpractice being imposed on our students by bubble-in accountability. This year, we will also showcase the countdown to the failure of NCLB to meet its accountability targets. 

Surprisingly, true believers in high-stakes testing aren't ignoring the law's anniversary and its target of 100% proficiency. The Democrats for Education Reform Statement Marks the Twelfth Anniversary of the No Child Left Behind Act press release brags that "NCLB’s policies are now a permanent part of the education policy landscape."

DFER's Charlie Barone was an architect of NCLB and yet he proclaims the truth that reformers usually prefer to duck. He compares "current reform efforts on issues like standards, assessments, choice, teacher evaluation, and tenure" to NCLB.

If you liked NCLB, you will love DFER's, Arne Duncan's, and the Billionaires Boys Club's versions of NCLB-type testing on steroids. I'm curious, however, about the data that DFER cites to celebrate the output-driven mandates of the last twelve years. It links to data produced by "its inexorable march forward" to top-down micromanaging of our diverse nation's schools. It shows the $1000 per low-income student, per year increase in Title I, input-driven spending.  DFER remains silent about any supposed increases in student performance.  

The noneducators who gave us NCLB and the even worse policies of the Duncan administration remain preoccupied with their political fights.  Their lesson from NCLB is focused on "those pushing back," i.e. their adult nemeses. Once again, reformers show themselves oblivious to real-world outputs, the effects of their handiwork on poor students of color.-JT(@drjohnthompson)Image via. 

Morning Video: Awesome Student Introduction Of President Obama

Harlem Children's Zone student introduced President Obama at last week's Promise Zone announcement:

Remember, Promise Zones and Promise Neighborhoods are different things and that claims surrounding the original Harlem Children's Zone have been challenged and attempts to replicate it have been difficult. New York Daily News Via HuffPost and ChalkbeatNY

 

Morning Video: Duncan Rolls Out New School Discipline Guidelines

Watch the announcement above (or here) or click here to watch a PBS NewsHour segment on whether the announcement will have positive impacts or not.

Afternoon Video: White House Seeks Classroom Videographers

 Find out more about the White House Film Fest -- then submit your entry

 

The White House is looking for student filmmakers to share short films about " the power of technology in classrooms" -- the deadline is January 29.

Media: About That Front-Page Washington Post Story...

ScreenHunter_02 Jan. 07 12.01The past week or so has seen a small resurgence of questions about the Washington Post's hard-working education blogger, Valerie Strauss, whose offerings at The Answer Sheet have generally run contra the current reform movement.

First word of it that I saw came from Patrick "Eduflack" Riccards, who raised questions about the appropriateness of having Strauss write a 12/31 front-page story (given her record as a blogger) and poked holes in the reporting and writing of the piece itself (about Duncan's possible involvement in the NYC chancellor selection process). Read it here: Personal Agendas and Objective Reporting.

Strauss usually writes for online only, not in print, and isn't an education columnist in the traditional sense like the Post's Jay Mathews or the Times' former education columnists Michael Winerip, Richard Rothstein, or Sam Freedman. But her work -- or should I say the guest posts she frequently runs? -- appears under the Post banner online, and the distinctions between different categories of stories aren't always apparent online, anyway.

Andy Rotherham has some additional thoughts about the story's lack of context here.

EdWeek's PoliticsK12 blog also published this entry (How Much Sway Does Arne Duncan Have in Local Decisions, Anyway?) noting Strauss's tendency towards "sometimes" criticism of the Obama administration's education policies and its main advocate, Arne Duncan and that it's unclear if Duncan's input would have had any effect, anyway. 

I would only add that we still don't know whether the story was pitched or not, and by whom, or who advocated for it within the newsroom.  Regardless, the Washington Post editors who assigned and edited and placed the story so prominently-- not just Strauss -- who are responsible for the quality and appropriateness of the story, as well as its placement on the front page, as well as that it was a holiday week and other reporters may not have been available.  

Previous posts: Who Are Education's Biggest Trolls (Besides Me)?WashPost Blog Irks Reformy BloggerDebating Valerie Strauss. More here. Disclosure: Strauss has run one or two pieces that I've written -- and turned down one or two as well. 

Morning Video: Weingarten Vague On Testing Delays, Specific On DC Successes

Click this half-hour CSPAN video from just before the holidays above (or here if it doesn't load properly) and/or read this PoliticsK12 blog post about the appearance (AFT's Weingarten Talks Michelle Rhee, Common Core, Pitfalls in Obama's Education Strategy) which highlights Weingarten's stance on standardized testing uses and on DC's recent successes.

AM News: Universal Preschool -- Can De Blasio Do What Obama Hasn't?

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De Blasio Launches Formal Campaign for Pre-K WNYC: The mayor-elect unveiled its first video at the childcare center Friends of Crown Heights. He was surrounded by children's advocates from several organizations, as well as the economist Jeffrey Sachs—who is among several luminaries lending his name to the cause. 

Formal Beginning to de Blasio’s Plan to Expand, and Pay for, Prekindergarten NYT: Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio has lined up celebrities and other notables in an effort to marshal public support for a tax on high-earners to improve New York City’s prekindergarten and after-school programs.

Texas Shuttering Campuses At Six Charter Schools Texas Tribune: Identified for closure under the law are American Youthworks in Austin; Azleway Charter School in Tyler; Honors Academy in Farmers Branch; and Jamie's House Charter School, Koinonia Community Learning Academy, and the Richard Milburn Academy in Houston. Several of the schools focus on serving troubled youth or high school dropouts.

School Leaders On What Determines Student Success NPR: Host Michel Martin continues her conversation with school leaders about students' math and reading skills.

D.C. adopts new K-12 science standards Washington Post: The D.C. State Board of Education voted Wednesday to adopt new K-12 science standards meant to strengthen science education by prioritizing critical thinking and problem solving over memorization of facts.

How to Share Space and Still Get Along WNYC: This week, the Department of Education and the New York City Charter School Center, via NYC Collaborates, brought a group of principals together to talk about how to share nicely, or nicer anyway. Here are their top four lessons.

Chicago Board of Ed: Downsized headquarters, supersized contract, and military school WBEZ: Chicago’s school board approved a number of measures at the monthly board meeting Wednesday:

How young newsmakers helped shape the world in 2013 PBS NewsHour:From drone strikes and cutting edge medical research, to Hollywood talent and European immigration, youth from around the world challenged us to view their issues more compassionately and unite across ideological lines. We look back at some of the year's top young newsmakers.

AM News: USDE Withdraws SIG Report Due To Errors

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U.S. Department of Education to Redo SIG Analysis Due to Contractor Error PoliticsK12: The analysis, which was released just a couple of weeks ago, excluded about half of the schools that entered the newly revamped SIG program in its first year (the 2010-11 school year) and about a third of the schools that started in the second year (the 2011-12 school year.) It's unclear if the do-over will significantly change those conclusions. 

Head Start funding partially restored in federal budget deal EdSource Today: Head Start lost about 57,000 slots for children, including more than 5,600 in California, because of cuts under federal sequestration, a program of automatically triggered, across-the-board spending cuts. These cuts have continued to ripple through Head Start operations month by month as they cycle through their federal grant processes.

Arrest Leads to Shake-Up of Alexander's Leadership Team PoliticsK12: Longtime Capitol Hill staffer and edu-nerd extraordinaire David Cleary, the GOP staff director for the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, has become the chief of staff to Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn. Alexander, a former U.S. secretary of education, currently serves as the top GOP lawmaker on the Senate education committee. 

Mike Huckabee's "Common Core is Dead" Line Not What He Told State Chiefs State EdWatch:The former Arkansas governor said he is dissatisfied with the implementation of the common core and how it has become "hijacked" by other interests.

Charter Leader Denies Insider's Advantage WNYC: “I’m not suggesting that I don’t know anyone at Tweed, I do,” she said, referring to the D.O.E.'s headquarters. “So if you’re saying can I pick up the phone and call folks, yes, I can. But does that mean from a policy perspective I’ve gotten any advantages? Absolutely not.”

Lots more news below.

Continue reading "AM News: USDE Withdraws SIG Report Due To Errors" »

Quotes: "Public Investment Hasn't Withered" [Like Obama Says]

Quotes2There’s no clear trend for public spending on education as a percentage of the U.S. economy, but public investment hasn’t withered. -- FackCheck.org 

Charts: US Education Spending Not As Dire As Obama Claimed

image from cdn.factcheck.orgFactCheck.org took a look at President Obama's claim last week that education spending was withering over time and came to the conclusion that he was wrong (Obama on Education Investments). "It has increased from 4.7 percent [of GDP]in 1985 to 5.1 percent in 2010 with ups and downs along the way."

Quotes: Pay No Attention To The Money We're *Already* Spending

It’s fascinating to watch a lot of armchair quarterbacking [about Duncan’s competitive grant and waiver programs]... People never want to critique money that goes to prop up the status quo. -- TN state commissioner Kevin Huffman in Stephanie Simon's recent Politico piece

Morning Video: What Students Should Know - & How They Should Learn It

"In the past, public school standards varied state to state. With backing from the federal government, some governors and superintendents collaborated on a national "Common Core." But they define only the "what" -- what kids should know, not how they should be taught." (Defining What Public School Students Should Know) Rebroadcast from 08/2013

Quotes: Sherriff Duncan "All Out Of Bullets"?

In 2009, Arne was the new sheriff in town, with big boxes of ammunition and a shiny new gun. Now, it’s later in the movie and he’s all out of bullets and he’s trying to scare states by shaking a stick at them. - Rick Hess in Stephanie Simon's recent Politico piece

Quotes: Civil Rights Groups "Disappointed" On Teacher Equity

Quotes2The 50-state strategy [to ensure equitable distribution of effective teachers] should have been started 12 years ago. [The new waiver renewal guidance is] disappointing, and it sends a message that it's not at the top of their agenda. -- EdTrust's Kate Tromble in EdWeek (Civil Rights Groups Wary on Waiver-Renewal Guidelines

Thompson: Would Obama Consider $5B SIG Program Successful?

Arne_DuncanIn 2009, Arne Duncan must have told President Obama that his School Improvement Grant (SIG) experiment was risky. SIG would cost nearly $5 billion, as it tried to jumpstart the nation's lowest-performing 5,000 schools.  There was no time for laying a foundation for transformational change. In lieu of planning, a top-down governance would be imposed. Principals would be anointed as divine monarchs and told to produce transformational change in only three years - or else.

Collective punishment would be imposed on teachers. This would encourage other teacher-bashers to step up the blame game.  One of the Democratic Party's most loyal constituencies, teachers' unions, would be alienated and the rank-in-file demoralized. If the benefits were only incremental, would a backlash against education be encouraged? 

What would the President have decided if warned that gains on reading tests would only be 2.5 points per year? Could he not anticipate conservatives such as Education Next's Andy Smarick noting "a cost of one billion dollars for each point of improvement in reading proficiency." (emphasis in the original) Had Duncan warned the President that those low performing schools would only increase their reading scores by 1.5 points per year faster than all other schools, would the President have asked about the down sides of a gamble that produced such small benefits? 

Above all, had the President been told that student performance would decline in 1/3rd of schools, would he have asked follow-up questions? Was there something inherent in the federal micromanaging of SIG that would encourage primitive teach-to-the-test that would backfire and make conditions worse for many students?-JT(@drjohnthompson) image via.     

Quotes: Duncan Only Has Himself To Blame, Says Rotherham

Quotes2One reason the suburbs are complacent is that politicians, notable amongst them Duncan and the President, spent a lot of time telling suburban voters there that any law that said 40 percent of the nation’s schools needed improvement was obviously flawed. - Andy "Eduwonk" Rotherham on Common Core pushback

Morning Video: Duncan Does MSNBC's "Morning Joe"

 

Duncan explains his clumsy remarks re white suburban moms and tries to push through to the launch of his new teacher recruitment/retention effort (also in print news and on WNYC so far today).

Update: White House Defends, Duncan Regrets/Reiterates*


ScreenHunter_07 Nov. 18 22.33

Thanks to Philip Elliott's AP writeup we now know that Obama spokesperson Jay Carney (blue tie above left) defended Arne Duncan (albeit vaguely) at Monday's press briefing, in response to questions form Politico's Jon Allen (gold tie above right). See transcript below or watch video here.) Duncan issued an apology later Monday afternoon but reiterated his point that nobody looks good on Common Core assessments ("every demographic group has room for improvement").

*Updated Tuesday 8:45: Roundup of news coverage begins below the fold (click below).

Continue reading "Update: White House Defends, Duncan Regrets/Reiterates*" »

AM News: President & First Lady Push New Ed Initiatives

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Obama to Unveil Competition to Overhaul High School Wall Street Journal: President Barack Obama will unveil a $100 million Youth CareerConnect competition Tuesday aimed at finding new ways to better prepare high-school students.

Michelle Obama Visits '106 & Park' To Talk Higher Education Vibe: Today, First Lady Michelle Obama brought her words of wisdom and encouragement to BET's "106 & Park." She sat down with show hosts Bow Wow and Keshia Chanté to speak about her personal and her family's stance on education.

How Court's Bus Ruling Sealed Differences In Detroit Schools NPR: It's been 40 years since the Supreme Court accepted what became a landmark case about school desegregation. The case was controversial because it involved busing students between a largely African-American city and its white suburban areas. The city was Detroit and the ruling helped cement differences between urban schools and suburban ones.

Homeless Students A Growing Problem For Schools NPR: It's parent-teacher conference time. But for many students across the country, finding a bed at night is top of mind. Host Michel Martin talks about the growing number of homeless students in the U.S., with NPR Education Correspondent Claudio Sanchez, and Larissa Dickinson, a social worker for Mobile County Public Schools in Alabama.

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Quotes: "No More Talk About Scared White Suburban Moms"

Quotes2Stay positive and relentlessly talk about how the new standards are rigorous and will help prepare our kids for college and career. No more talk about Tea Partiers, conspiracy theories, the D.C. bubble, the blogosphere or scared white suburban moms. Defend Common Core on its merits. - Andy Smarick giving advice to Arne Duncan and other Common Core supporters in Politico's story this morning.

AM News: Duncan Remarks Anger Common Core Critics

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'White moms' remark fuels Common Core clash Politico: Education Secretary Arne Duncan realized fairly quickly that he had stumbled.Two hours later, with those comments sparking outrage on social media, Duncan told POLITICO that he “didn’t say it perfectly.” But he stood by his thesis: To oppose the Common Core is to oppose progress.

Arne Duncan to State Chiefs: Prove Critics Wrong by Setting the Bar Higher EdWeek: Despite the intense tone of some of Duncan's statements, the question-and-answer session had an upbeat tone as state leaders stopped several times to applaud (literally applaud) the changes in renewal requirements.

Press Virtually Mum As Arne Duncan Blames Common Core Opposition on 'White Suburban Moms' Newsbusters: A Washington Post item by Valerie Strauss at its "Answer Sheet" blog quotes a dispatch from Libbly Nelson at the Politico, but does not link to it. I couldn't find a related original story by Nelson at her Politico archive or in a Politico search on Education Secretary Arne Duncan's name (not in quotes).

At Forums, State Education Commissioner Faces a Barrage of Complaints NYT: John B. King Jr. has become a sounding board for crowds of parents, educators and others who equate his name with all they consider to be broken in schooling today.

Money for new curriculum is out, education firms ready sales pitch KPCC:  State funds for the Common Core transition are unique in that they are largely unregulated.  Even though California passed the  Common Core standards in 2010, it has provided schools little guidance on which of the countless books and other materials out there actually meet those standards. The state typically approves teaching materials.

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Quotes: Duncan On Lowly Teacher Prep Programs

Quotes2If teaching is - and should be - one of our most revered professions, teacher preparation programs should be among a university's most important responsibilities. Unfortunately, this is the exception, not the rule. --  USDE Secretary Arne Duncan via USA Today

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