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AM News: Clinton Endorses Obama Test Reduction Proposal (Sanders?)

Obama encouraging limits on standardized student tests AP: Hillary Rodham Clinton embraced the principles laid out by Obama. "We should be ruthless in looking at tests and eliminating them if they do not actually help us move our kids forward," she said in a statement.

See blizzard of testing coverage here: 

Too Much Testing? Ed. Dept. Outlines Steps to Help States and Districts Cut Back PK12: The U.S. Department of Education has released some general principles for states and districts to help them figure out how to cut back on assessments and ensure that they're used to drive instruction.

Study says standardized testing is overwhelming nation’s public schools Washington Post: Typical student takes 112 required tests from pre-K through 12th grade; federal officials vow to help reduce redundant, low-quality exams.

Obama encouraging limits on standardized student tests AP: And from the 2016 presidential campaign, Democratic contender Hillary Rodham Clinton embraced the principles laid out by Obama. "We should be ruthless in looking at tests and eliminating them if they do not actually help us move our kids forward," she said in a statement.

Obama proposes capping standardized testing at 2% of classroom time Los Angeles Times:  The Obama administration executed a significant about-face in its education policy Saturday, calling for a cap on the amount of time students spend taking standardized tests.

Obama Administration Calls for Limits on Testing in Schools NYT: The administration acknowledged its own role in the proliferation of tests, and urged schools to make exams less onerous and more purposeful.

Ed Dept.: Too Much Testing, Partly Our Fault Politico: The Education Department took some of the blame for the sometimes stressful, excessive and time-consuming testing at many schools and said Saturday that it hasn't done enough to help states tackle the problem.

A Standardized Test Parents Need to Take LA Times: The Obama administration has announced a plan to limit the amount of time students spend taking standardized tests -- and to ensure that such examinations are limited to "tests that are worth taking."

Obama Wants To Limit Class Time Devoted To Standardized Tests AP: Students spend about 20 to 25 hours a school year taking standardized tests, according to a study of the nation's 66 largest school districts that was released Saturday by the Council of Great City Schools. But it's not known how much class time students spend preparing for tests that became mandatory, starting in third grade, under the George W. Bush-era No Child Left Behind law and are a flashpoint in the debate over the Common Core academic standards.

Following President's Call, New York Touts Efforts to Reduce Overtesting WNYC: In New York, state education officials have taken steps to reduce over-testing, and indeed the Obama administration called New York a leader in this effort. These steps include limiting the amount of time students spend on required standardized tests and establishing a grant to allow administrators to review the assessments given to students.

Students Take Too Many Redundant Tests, Study Finds EdWeek: The comprehensive report by the Washington-based Council of the Great City Schools examines testing in 66 of the council's 68 member school districts, looking at the types of tests administered, their frequency, and how they are used. The findings are expected to add hard numbers and evidence to the fractious national debate around whether U.S. students are being overtested.

President Obama Calls To Curb Number Of Standardized Tests NPR: The Obama Administration has a plan to limit the number of standardized tests that children take. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks to correspondent Anya Kamenetz about what changes the efforts might bring.

Teaching Teachers To Teach: It's Not So Elementary NPR: How are great teachers created? Practice, practice, practice, says Deborah Ball, dean of the University of Michigan School of Education.

The Online College That's Helping Undocumented Students NPR: There are no federal laws in this country that prohibit undocumented students from enrolling in college. But few can afford it. Now, one online college is offering them an option.

With Switch From Pencils To Computers, GED Gets Tougher For Inmates NPR: Formerly, the test to get a GED diploma was multiple-choice, and taken with a pencil. Not anymore: Now, it requires computer skills some inmates simply don't have.

Superintendents in Florida Say Tests Failed State’s Schools, Not Vice Versa NYT: Superintendents are arguing that student tests imported from Utah were flawed and should not be used to give schools A-to-F grades.

Grading on the Curve: Surprise: Florida and Texas Excel in Math and Reading Scores NYT: A new analysis, taking into account student demographics, finds the states in third and fourth place, after Massachusetts and New Jersey.

Setting Bold Course, Delaware Serves Up Info on Teacher-Prep Performance Teacher Beat: The reports also contain data on some of the measures the U.S. Department of Education wants states to use to grade their preparation programs.

Porter Ranch bucks trend of students flocking away from LAUSD LA Times:About a third of the campus' 1,100 students in kindergarten through eighth grade have come from nearby charter and private schools – a development that caught officials off-guard. "We didn't anticipate that; these students were off the grid," said Principal Mary Melvin.

How a growing Arkansas town avoided segregation in its two high schools PBS: In 2006, the Rogers school district faced a difficult choice. The student population had grown enormously over the past decade and school officials didn’t relish the prospect of a massive high school of more than 4,000 students. They wanted to open a new school, but they didn’t want schools to be segregated by ethnicity, which would surely happen if the schools were zoned by neighborhood. Nearby Springdale had been in the same position and had ended up with one school that had almost twice the percentage of Latino students as the other.

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