About this blog Subscribe to this blog

AM News: Data Storage Nonprofit InBloom Closing Down

News2

InBloom Student Data Repository to Close NYT: The student data warehousing venture that became a lightning rod for some parents’ data privacy and security concerns, announced it would close. See also WNYC: Sun Sets on Controversial Student Data Project inBloom. [EdWeek broke the story, far as I know.]

Vision, Reality Collide in Common-Core Tests EdWeek: A glass-half-full reading focuses on the exams' technological advances and embrace of performance-based assessment. On the flip side, a confluence of political, technical, and financial constraints have led to some scaling back of the ambitious plans the consortia first laid out.

U.S. News Releases 2014 Best High Schools Rankings HuffPost/ US News: Some familiar names joined Dallas-based School for the Talented and Gifted and the two BASIS schools in the top 10 this year, including the Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science and Technology in Georgia and Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Virginia. Both schools retained their third and fourth place rankings, respectively, while Pine View School in Florida also held onto its No. 6 position.

Teachers are losing their jobs, but Teach for America’s expanding Hechinger Report: Of the first 13 Seattle recruits whose two-year commitment is now over, Maldonado and 10 others remain in their classrooms. While he thinks TFA should have done a better job before bringing his cohort to the city, Maldonado says he still believes strongly in the organization and worked at its summer institute in New York City last year.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., Talks To ABC News’ David Muir ABC News: "How did I go to a commuter college that cost $50 a semester? Because a lot of other people put a little something in that kept the costs low at a public school so I had a chance and a lotta kids like me had a chance to get an education, and go out, and do something with it."

More news below (and throughout the day at @alexanderrusso).

Waiting Lists for Kindergarten Drop by Half, New York City Says NYT: In some neighborhoods, the process of applying for kindergarten has come to resemble a mini-Ivy League, with parents hiring consultants, touring scores of schools and inundating online forums.

Kansas: Governor Signs School Funding Bill NYT: Gov. Sam Brownback signed a school funding bill on Monday that increases aid for poor districts to satisfy a portion of a State Supreme Court ruling and that also ends the state’s mandate for teacher tenure.

D.C. officials to consider eight proposals for new charter schools Washington Post: Two of the eight proposals would establish boarding high schools, including one that would aim to meet the particular needs of children in foster care and another that would connect students with internships on Capitol Hill.

Reading, Technology and...Still With Us? Attention Span WAMU: As rapidly evolving technology changes how we read - taking us from page to screen and back again - our brains change and readers can sometimes find longer, denser texts more difficult to read over time. We consider how technology is changing our reading brains and how we might strike a balance between types of reading at different ages.

What Exactly Is 'High-Quality' Preschool? NPR: Many educators tout the benefits of preschool, but there's no clear standard for what qualifies as a quality program. Researchers say that when it comes to pre-K, Tulsa, Okla., gets it right.

See what they'll be teaching in the Chicago public schools Daily Caller: Ron Fritze, a historian, the dean of Athens State University, and author of the book “Invented Knowledge,” says that Bernal’s theories are not historically accurate and have no place in Chicago schools.

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

On Common Core standards assessment, there should be no going back to a discredited past; but going forward will be difficult unless No Child Left Behind, in particular its annual external testing, is removed. It's hard to find better evidence that No Child Left Behind has become No Child Gets Ahead than the federal Education Department's prohibition of testing advanced students outside their grade level -- which means, since the Common Core's eighth grade mathematics level is about equal to China's sixth, that America will only discover the hard way, when it's too late for most of our country's children, that their leaders have spent all this money and gone to all this trouble to produce a populace with futures just as uncompetitive as they were before.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in This Week In Education are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.