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AM News: NYC Might Require Charters To Accept Mid-Year Transfers

What you need to know about ‘backfill’ Chalkbeat: Backfilling seats that open up can pose steep challenges for schools. Students who enter the school midyear or at one of a school’s higher grade levels can have trouble adjusting to a new school and be academically behind. Midyear entries especially are more likely to have unstable home lives, leading to them leaving the school—meaning that one “backfilled” seat might actually be filled by two or three students over the course of a year.

 The Curious Rejection of One S.C. District's Testing-Waiver Request PoliticsK12: In a March 10 rejection letter, however, Deborah Delisle, assistant secretary for K-12, explained that the No Child Left Behind Act requires that all students within a state be held to the same standards and tested on the same tests. She said this is essential given the move to new college- and career-ready standards.

At West Side Chicago school, kids go without teachers WBEZ: Take the Austin Business and Entrepreneurship Academy on the city’s West Side, where students have spent much of this year without key teachers. Their core courses in English and science have been taught mostly by substitutes this year—sometimes a different substitute every day—meaning no homework, and often no classwork.  One student said students are passed automatically since there are no teachers.

D.C. Moves To Extend School Day At Low-Performing Schools WAMU: Mayor Vincent Gray and D.C. Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson want students and 40 of the city's lowest-performing schools to stay in school a little longer every day.

Status Quo at Elite New York Schools: Few Blacks and Hispanics NYT: The stagnant racial demographics at the city’s nine specialized high schools led Mayor Bill de Blasio to call again for increasing their diversity.

Video: 'No Kid Goes Hungry' Plan Goes Viral NBC News: More than 700 people, from as far way as Taiwan, have donated almost $20,000 to a Michigan 3rd grader's plan to pay off delinquent lunch accounts. WILX's Amanda Malkowski reports. 

Video: Parents Rally Behind Extreme Bullying Victim NBC News: A group of Ohio parents rally behind a 14-year-old developmentally challenged student after a gym teacher and some students are charged with bullying him. WKYC's Lynna Lai reports. 

Obesity Linked To Lower Grades Among Teen Girls NPR: The reason for the link isn't clear, but researchers say obesity's effect on self-image and self-esteem might be partly to blame.

Flobots classroom project takes off in Denver AP: The Flobots, a Denver hip-hop band that gained fame with the hit single "Handlebars," are known for social activism and supporting the Occupy Wall Street movement. Drew Elder, a senior vice president of the investment firm Janus, is more familiar with the cello than with Chuck D....

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The chaotic enforcement of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (and other federal laws) in South Carolina (and other states) indicates once again the need to rewrite that law, whose current version, No Child Left Behind, expired in 2007. Any rewrite will necessarily have to curtail the discretion of the Department of Education to waive its provisions, since the abuse of the waiver authority by the current department provides no citizens with assurance of equal protection under the law. A better direction for a revised law, currently up for consideration in the U.S. Senate (the House has acted), has been shown by the coalition government of the United Kingdom, whose Education Act 2011 raises academic accountability through reforming the assessments leading to qualifications, a concept almost completely missing in American education and one especially underemphasized by the Obama administration, for whom the main qualification for assistance in higher education is poverty rather than demonstrated capacity to benefit from the courses on offer in what remains the strongest higher education sector in the world.

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