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Morning Video: How Children Use Touch-Screen Technology

Here's an interview segment that I found embedded in Hanna Rosin's new Atlantic Magazine story, The Touch-Screen Generation, which will probably engage or appall you depending on your predisposition towards technology and your income level. 

 

Is interactive media any different from old-fashioned TV time? Is the iPad any more addictive -- or informative -- than previous technology?    Really, just go read the article. 

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"The one where the bee comes out"

The children are focused on the iPad because it mimics aspects of the real world which they desperately need to notice and understand, through interaction.

The interaction is false: The bee isn't coming out of anywhere.

"What do you think? (pause) Yes, I think that, too." That's a scene out of Fahrenheir 451, for God's sake! Nobody thinks anything, and the child is alone and unheard.

Babies are following a neurological program to learn something vital, that the iPad isn't teaching. Give them back their tea sets, their sand buckets, and most of all their flesh-and-blood listeners!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ssjokgx0pUQ

I feel like the kids at this age shouldn't be learning from an i-pad, instead learning face to face in a class room where they can interact with other students and teachers. Kids that young are going to be relying on these technical devices to where they'll become addicted to them everywhere they go. The kids might as well be home schooled if the iPad is teaching them 90% of what the teacher would teach them in a classroom. It's great to see them learning from the iPad but I think the teachers should stick with the old fashion style of learning and maybe the kids can use the iPad in class on their free time.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in This Week In Education are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.