About this blog Subscribe to this blog

Pictures: Welcome, This Is Your New Classroom [Of The Future]

image from llnw.wbez.org
From WBEZ Chicago:  MOOCs and distance learning

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

I teach 16-year-olds for whom the simple physical realities of ratio, rate, and proportion don't exist. Instead, they have for reference a Loony Tunes virtual reality in which things bounce however high or tip whenever. They click and drag without mass or inertia, and feel no drag or buoyancy, for their whole developmental window.

Text and image are gibberish to them, filtered by their young minds in a losing struggle to get a clear space among and noise of ads and distractions deliberately loaded into every centimeter and second of their screen time.

I sat on my states Math and Science Advisory Council and watched the Gates' Common Core grantees mindlessly strip the K-3 science curriculum of double pan balances, and replace those with formalistic Newtonian equivalencies, to be taught with arrows shopped into that green screen.

If you thought about what you've done to little kids already with this wildly promoted and even legally mandated crap, you'd have pity on them.

Please, give them back a bucket of real sand and their plastic pan balances. You're crippling them.

You may think children can handle these kinds of classrooms- but I don't believe it. While every student learns differently, this is not the answer. People need to be in a classroom, with a teacher there. You will learn so much more that way. Distance learning is harder, and requires a lot more. Not everyone can handle these kinds of classes, and I don't believe anyone should be forced to take online courses. It should still be an option, but not the only option.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in This Week In Education are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.