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Five Best Blogs: Dem Think Tank Scrutinizes Waiver Applications

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Mass., Tenn. Praised in New Report on NCLB Waiver Plans PK12: Colorado's data system can't link student data to individual or multiple teachers, Florida's plan makes it unclear whether schools would be held accountable for subgroup performance, and Indiana didn't specify what factors would be used in new teacher evaluations. 

A Sellers’ Market for SIG T1DL: So, when did “what the market will bear” become an accepted practice in public education? 

Cracking Down On Charter Schools? Huffington Post: The most recent call to close underperforming charter schools came not from a teachers' union or a school district, but from a charter-school trade association. 

2011 Year in Review NSVF: NewSchools played a key role in supporting the Growing Excellent Academies for Teachers and Principals Act to support the creation and expansion of teacher and principal training academies, approved by the Senate in October. 

The stories behind the story of K12 Inc. The Answer Sheet:  Local reporters in farflung places were paying attention to virtual schools long before folks in big cities took notice. And for that, they deserve a heap of credit.

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I am in favor of no child left policy. This may lead to more great policies around the world.

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