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AM News: NCLB Waiver Process Moves Ahead

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NCLB Waiver Judges Identified Politics K-12: The waiver judges are an interesting mix of researchers, think tank and advocacy folks, and those with experience working for a state education agency or local district. In fact, the field of 21 is heavily stacked with people who have deep experience at state departments.

States ramp up use of teacher evaluations AP (Boston Globe): Teachers and principals are worrying more about their own report cards these days. They're being graded on more than student test scores. The way educators are evaluated is changing across the country, with a switch from routine "satisfactory" ratings to actual proof that students are learning.

Charter schools impress half of California voters L.A. Times: In the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times poll, 52% of respondents had a favorable opinion of charter schools. But voters overall opposed supporting charters at the expense of resources for traditional schools.

South Korean students' 'year of hell' culminates with exams day CNN: Most South Korean students consider their final year in high school "the year of hell." It is when all students are put to the ultimate test.

Calif. teacher with porn sites gets put on leave AP (Boston Globe): A high school teacher is under investigation after school officials said she was maintaining a pornographic website from her school-issued laptop computer.

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