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Weekend Reading: Teen Terrorist Edition

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New Chairman Seeks More Power for Watchdogs NYT:  Mr. Issa has already drawn up a list of big targets [including] tens of millions of dollars spent on redundant programs within federal agencies or squandered through corrupt contracting procedures... No More A’s for Good Behavior NYT:  There are no national statistics about the number of schools shifting to standards-based grading. But the idea has been around for a while, and Ken O’Connor, a former Canadian high school teacher turned grading consultant. It’s an inevitable extension, he says, of standards-based learning.... Prime Number NYT: Fifty:  The percentage increase, in inflation-adjusted dollars, that graduating college students in 2008 borrowed compared with their counterparts in 1996... What We Don't Know Can Hurt Us The American Prospect:  These programs have no uniform way of collecting data, if they collect such information at all, and no system for sharing what they do record with grade schools to track students' progress over time... Bomb Plot Suspect Graduated From Westview High KPTV:  The suspect in the attempted bombing at Pioneer Square's Christmas tree-lighting ceremony graduated from Westview High School in Beaverton in 2009.  Former classmates describe Mohamed Mohamud as nice, outgoing and popular. 

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