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TRANSITION: Duncan's Chicago Was Poster Child For NCLB Resistance

Many educators will be happy to know that, under Arne Duncan Chicago was the poster child for districts resisting and criticizing the law.  Others may find themselves worrying that as EdSec Duncan will be a little too loose with district "flexibility."  But there's little doubt that Duncan (and Daley) fought tooth and nail against many of the law's key provisions like tutoring, transfers, and AYP ratings. Some clips:

To Duncan, NLCB law is 'burdensome'...  Chicago Sun Times 2003
Tutoring firm expelled from 7 of city's schools. Tribune 2005
Chicago public schools chief may sue US agency over tutoring Tribune 2004
Failing Schools across Illinois Scramble to Obey Federal Law. Sun Times 2003
New rules help raise Illinois students' test scores. Tribune 2004
Daley protests student transfers Sun Times 2002
Fewer join in school transfer program - Duncan criticizes... Sun Times 2003
Schools blast state test data that could lead to sanctions Sun Times 2003
A Failing Grade Mother Jones 2003
MANY CHICAGO STUDENTS CAN'T TRANSFER SCHOOLS 2003
50 schools can send students to better ones - The catch is... Sun Times 2003
No Child Left Behind Act causing hardships for many public... NPR 2003

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Man, you sure do love a good slap fight, don't you? Going after David Hoff like that. I guess Andywonk won't play anymore?

CA

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