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USDE Wants To Know: Can I Have That Email Back?

We've all sent out an email that we didn't mean to send.  But for most of us it doesn't happen all the time.  However, one out of two email announcements from the USDE's Office of Public Affairs these days seems to be followed within a few minutes with a "recall" message.  Here's today's example:

The sender would like to recall the message, "U.S. SECRETARY OF EDUCATION MARGARET SPELLINGS HIGHLIGHTS NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND IN RALEIGH".

With the occasional exception, I don't bother trying to figure out what was wrong with the first message -- wrong city?  wrong time?  But these email recalls have gotten so frequent that it's hard not to notice them and wonder whether this is an example of ineptitude or how little anyone cares about emails sent to the press.  My friends on the EWA listserve -- knowing how easily persuaded I am to do their dirty work -- have been hectoring me to point this out. 

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Seems an appropriate follow-up would be a piece on how many of those EWA members work at daily papers that publish "corrections" on well, a daily basis. Would the mistakes in the original stories be examples of a reporter's ineptitude or just show how little they care?

Does Todd work for the dept? Those errors might be ya know a rush at a deadline. Also typically reporters' stroies are a lot longer than a press release anouncing the secretary will be in Raleigh. Also, i'm guessing reporter's have to file corrections infrequently, just because there is one error in a whole paper doesnt put it on par with repeated errors in press releases...

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